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Surgery Today

, Volume 39, Issue 9, pp 818–820 | Cite as

Hypersplenism caused by an accessory spleen mimicking an intra-abdominal neoplasm: Report of a case

  • Jaime Ruiz-Tovar
  • Emilio Ripalda
  • Rafael Beni
  • Jose Nistal
  • Carlos Monroy
  • Pedro Carda
Case Report

Abstract

Accessory spleens are usually asymptomatic, although they may cause hematological disorders associated with hypersplenism, usually after splenectomy. Moreover, cases of hypersplenism occurring secondary to enlargement of an accessory spleen with an unaltered normal spleen have been reported. An accessory spleen can also mimic an intra-abdominal neoplasm. We report a case of hypersplenism that occurred secondary to an increase in the size of the accessory spleen, which was located in the mesentery close to the cecum, mimicking recurrence of previously resected renal carcinoma.

Key words

Accessory spleen Intra-abdominal mass Intra-abdominal neoplasm Hypersplenism Hemolytic anemia Thrombocytopenia Renal carcinoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaime Ruiz-Tovar
    • 1
  • Emilio Ripalda
    • 2
  • Rafael Beni
    • 1
  • Jose Nistal
    • 1
  • Carlos Monroy
    • 1
  • Pedro Carda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity Hospital Ramon y CajalMadridSpain
  2. 2.Department of UrologyUniversity Hospital Ramon y CajalMadridSpain

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