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Effects of exenatide long-acting release on cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

  • B. M. Bonora
  • A. Avogaro
  • G. P. FadiniEmail author
Original Article
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

Aims

Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Recent cardiovascular outcome trials (CVOTs) with liraglutide, semaglutide, and albiglutide have shown significant reduction in major adverse cardiovascular events. Conversely, the CVOT with exenatide long-acting release (ELAR) confirmed cardiovascular safety of the drug, but did not reached superiority versus placebo. Herein, we systematically evaluated the effect of ELAR versus placebo or active comparators on cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with T2D.

Methods

We screened the literature for randomized controlled trials reporting cardiovascular events and deaths in patients receiving ELAR versus those receiving placebo or any other glucose-lowering medications. Event rates were pooled and compared using the random-effects model.

Result

We retrieved 16 trials comparing the occurrence of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients treated with ELAR versus placebo or active comparators. The pooled rate ratio for cardiovascular events was similar in the two groups (0.99; 95% CI 0.92–1.06). The rate ratio for all-cause mortality was significantly lower in exenatide group than in comparators (0.87; 95% CI 0.77–0.97). When results of the EXSCEL trial were omitted, the pooled rate ratio for cardiovascular events and mortality was 0.80 (95% CI 0.40–1.63) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.30–1.84), respectively.

Conclusions

Treatment with ELAR does not increase the risk of cardiovascular events and may reduce all-cause mortality.

Keywords

Cardiovascular outcome trials Safety Pharmacology 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

GPF received grant support, lecture, or advisory board fees from AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, NovoNordisk, Sanofi, Genzyme, Abbott, Novartis, Merck Sharp & Dohme. BMB received lecture or advisory board fees from Novartis, Eli Lilly, AstraZeneca, and Boehringer-Ingelheim. AA received research grants, lecture, or advisory board fees from Merck Sharp & Dome, AstraZeneca, Novartis, Boehringher-Ingelheim, Sanofi, Mediolanum, Janssen, NovoNordisk.

Ethical approval

Not applicable.

Informed consent

Not applicable.

Supplementary material

592_2019_1347_MOESM1_ESM.docx (131 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 130 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l., part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of PadovaPaduaItaly

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