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Reply to comment: Serum bilirubin concentrations, type 2 diabetes, and incident coronary heart disease

  • Jing Wang
  • Xiaofen Wu
  • Yaru Li
  • Xu Han
  • Hua Hu
  • Fei Wang
  • Caizheng Yu
  • Xiulou Li
  • Kun Yang
  • Jing Yuan
  • Ping Yao
  • Xiaoping Miao
  • Sheng Wei
  • Youjie Wang
  • Weihong Chen
  • Yuan Liang
  • Huan Guo
  • Handong Yang
  • Tangchun Wu
  • Xiaomin Zhang
  • Meian HeEmail author
Letter to the Editor
  • 34 Downloads

We appreciate the comments by Dr. Kawada on our article [1], which recommended to conduct comprehensive analysis by including renal function and serum uric acid concentration in the multivariate model to assess the associations of serum bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk among type 2 diabetes (T2D) cases [2]. As indicated in Table 1, further introduction of estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) and serum uric acid into the multivariate model did not materially change the association of total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, and indirect bilirubin with CHD risk. The eGFR level was related to the incident CHD risk among T2D cases with marginally statistical significance (hazard ratio: 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.99–1.00; P = 0.033), while serum uric acid concentration was not (hazard ratio: 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.92–1.08, P = 0.94).

Table 1

Baseline bilirubin levels and the risk of incident coronary heart disease in type 2 diabetes (n = 2918)

Characteristics

Keywords

Bilirubin Type 2 diabetes Coronary heart disease Renal function Uric acid 

Notes

Funding

This work was funded by the grant from the National Natural Science Foundation (grant NSFC- 81872698, 81522040 and 81473051); the Program for HUST Academic Frontier Youth Team; National Key R&D Program of China (2017YFC0907501); the 111 Project (No. B12004); Innovative Research Team in University of Ministry of Education of China (No. IRT1246); China Medical Board (No. 12–113).The Natural Science Foundation of Hubei Province of China (2017CFC856) and Faculty Development Grant from Hubei University of Medicine (2016QDJZR12).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict.

Human and animals rights

All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2008.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all patients for being included in the study.

References

  1. 1.
    Wang J, Wu X, Li Y et al (2017) Serum bilirubin concentrations and incident coronary heart disease risk among patients with type 2 diabetes: the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort. Acta Diabetol 54(3):257–264CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Tomoyuki K (2018) Serum bilirubin concentrations, type 2 diabetes and incident coronary heart disease. Acta Diabetol.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00592-018-1250-8 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Wang J, Yu Y, Li X et al (2018) Serum uric acid levels and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cohort study and meta-analysis. Diabetes Metab Res Rev 34(7):e3046CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Zalawadiya SK, Veeranna V, Mallikethi-Reddy S et al (2015) Uric acid and cardiovascular disease risk reclassification: findings from NHANES III. Eur J Prev Cardiol 22(4):513–518CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Keenan T, Zhao W, Rasheed A et al (2016) Causal assessment of serum urate levels in cardiometabolic diseases through a mendelian randomization study. J Am Coll Cardiol 67(4):407–416CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaofen Wu
    • 3
  • Yaru Li
    • 2
  • Xu Han
    • 2
  • Hua Hu
    • 2
  • Fei Wang
    • 2
  • Caizheng Yu
    • 2
  • Xiulou Li
    • 4
  • Kun Yang
    • 4
  • Jing Yuan
    • 2
  • Ping Yao
    • 2
  • Xiaoping Miao
    • 5
  • Sheng Wei
    • 5
  • Youjie Wang
    • 2
  • Weihong Chen
    • 2
  • Yuan Liang
    • 2
  • Huan Guo
    • 2
  • Handong Yang
    • 4
  • Tangchun Wu
    • 2
  • Xiaomin Zhang
    • 2
  • Meian He
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Management, Department of Endocrinology, Renmin HospitalHubei University of MedicineShiyanChina
  2. 2.Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health for Incubating, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  3. 3.Department of Gerontology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  4. 4.Dongfeng Central Hospital, Dongfeng Motor Corporation and Hubei University of MedicineShiyanChina
  5. 5.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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