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Acta Diabetologica

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 119–122 | Cite as

Maternal hair metabolome analysis identifies a potential marker of lipid peroxidation in gestational diabetes mellitus

  • Xiaoling He
  • Jamie V. de Seymour
  • Karolina Sulek
  • Hongbo Qi
  • Hua Zhang
  • Ting-Li Han
  • Silas G. Villas-Bôas
  • Philip N. BakerEmail author
Short Communication

Introduction

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as an abnormal glucose tolerance that develops, or is first recognized during pregnancy; the development of GDM markedly increases risks of adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The immediate consequences include an increased likelihood of a Caesarean section, hypoglycaemia of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, and macrosomia. Longer-term implications of a pregnancy affected by GDM include a substantially increased risk of the mother developing type 2 diabetes postnatally, as well as the offspring having an increased susceptibility to obesity and related metabolic complications in adulthood. Within the Asia–Pacific region there are an estimated 76 million women at risk of having a pregnancy complicated by diabetes, with recent estimates suggesting up to 18 % of pregnancies in China may be complicated by GDM [1].

Metabolomic profiling is a strategy for investigating the low weight molecules that represent the...

Keywords

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Hair Sample Adipic Acid Fetal Growth Restriction Octanoic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank Gravida: National Centre for Growth and Development for funding the project. All metabolome analyses were carried out at the Centre for Genomics, Proteomics and Metabolomics of the University of Auckland. K.S. and P.N.B. are supported by Gravida: National Centre for Growth and Development (New Zealand); J.V.D.S. by the Agnes Paykel Trust (New Zealand).

Conflict of interest

None.

Human and animal rights

All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2008 [5].

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all patients included in the study.

References

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    Zhu WW, Yang HX, Wei YM, Yan J, Wang ZL, Li XL et al (2013) Evaluation of the value of fasting plasma glucose in the first prenatal visit to diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus in china. Diabetes Care 36(3):586–590PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Dudzik D, Zorawski M, Skotnicki M et al (2014) Metabolic fingerprint of gestational diabetes mellitus. J Prot 103:57–71CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Sulek K, Han T-L, Villas-Boas SG et al (2014) Hair metabolomics: identification of fetal compromise provides proof of concept for biomarker discovery. Theranostics 4(9):953–959PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Smart KF, Aggio RBM, Van Houtte JR, Villas-bôas SG (2010) Analytical platform for metabolome analysis of microbial cells using methyl chloroformate derivatization followed by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry. Nat Protoc 5:1709CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Inouye M, Mio T, Sumino K (2000) Dicarboxylic acids as markers of fatty acid peroxidation in diabetes. Atherosclerosis 148:197–202CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoling He
    • 1
  • Jamie V. de Seymour
    • 2
  • Karolina Sulek
    • 2
  • Hongbo Qi
    • 1
  • Hua Zhang
    • 1
  • Ting-Li Han
    • 1
    • 2
  • Silas G. Villas-Bôas
    • 3
  • Philip N. Baker
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologyThe First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical UniversityChongqingChina
  2. 2.Liggins InstituteUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  3. 3.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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