Acta Diabetologica

, Volume 52, Issue 2, pp 323–329 | Cite as

The use of continuous glucose monitoring systems in a pediatric population with type 1 diabetes mellitus in real-life settings: the AWeSoMe Study Group experience

  • M. Rachmiel
  • Z. Landau
  • M. Boaz
  • K. Mazor Aronovitch
  • N. Loewenthal
  • M. Ben-Ami
  • Y. Levy-Shraga
  • D. Modan-Moses
  • A. Haim
  • S. Abiri
  • O. Pinhas-Hamiel
Original Article

Abstract

Aims

The aim of the study was (a) to compare annual glycemic control in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who used a healthcare-funded continuous glucose monitoring system (RT-CGMS) to that of those who performed self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) only, in a real-life setting, and (b) to define parameters associated with compliance and glycemic control.

Methods

A total of 149 youth with T1DM (52.3 % females), mean age 11.8 ± 3.6 years, and 83 in the CGMS group were followed prospectively for 12 months. Glycemic control parameters and compliance to RT-CGMS were assessed periodically.

Results

Glycemic parameters did not differ significantly between the groups during follow-up periods. The time spent with RT-CGMS decreased and only 38 % used it for more than 75 % of the time during the 12 months (consistent users). Mean HbA1c decreased by 0.27 % in consistent users and increased by 0.21 % among intermittent users (used RT-CGMS less than 75 % of time), p = 0.013. Consistent users were younger 10. 6 ± 4.2 vs. 12.5 ± 3.6, p = 0.07, and had higher frequency of SMBG at baseline, 10.6 ± 4.9 vs. 6.3 ± 2.8, p = 0.011.

Conclusions

The adoption of RT-CGMS was low, even in a healthcare system that funds its use. Caregivers should consider patient characteristics when recommending RT-CGMS use.

Keywords

Continuous glucose monitoring Sensor Children Compliance HbA1c Glycemic control 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Rachmiel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Z. Landau
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • M. Boaz
    • 5
    • 2
  • K. Mazor Aronovitch
    • 2
    • 4
    • 6
  • N. Loewenthal
    • 7
  • M. Ben-Ami
    • 2
    • 6
  • Y. Levy-Shraga
    • 2
    • 6
  • D. Modan-Moses
    • 2
    • 6
  • A. Haim
    • 7
  • S. Abiri
    • 3
  • O. Pinhas-Hamiel
    • 2
    • 4
    • 6
  1. 1.Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Mellitus ServiceAssaf Harofeh Medical CenterZerifinIsrael
  2. 2.Sackler School of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  3. 3.Pediatric Endocrine and Diabetes UnitE. Wolfson Medical CenterHolonIsrael
  4. 4.Maccabi National Juvenile Diabetes CenterRaananaIsrael
  5. 5.Epidemiology and Research UnitE. Wolfson Medical CenterHolonIsrael
  6. 6.Pediatric Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Edmond and Lily Safra Children’s HospitalSheba Medical CenterRamat GanIsrael
  7. 7.Pediatric Endocrine UnitSoroka Medical CenterBeer-ShebaIsrael

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