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Acta Diabetologica

, Volume 51, Issue 3, pp 513–516 | Cite as

Effects of erythritol on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study

  • Nir Flint
  • Naomi M. Hamburg
  • Monika Holbrook
  • Pamela G. Dorsey
  • Rebecca M. LeLeiko
  • Alvin Berger
  • Peter de Cock
  • Douwina Bosscher
  • Joseph A. VitaEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

Sugar substitutes are important in the dietary management of diabetes mellitus. Erythritol is a non-caloric dietary bulk sweetener that reverses endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats. We completed a pilot study to examine the effects of erythritol on vascular function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Participants (n = 24) consumed erythritol 36 g/day as an orange-flavored beverage for 4 weeks and a single dose of 24 g during the baseline and final visits. We assessed vascular function before and after acute (2 h) and chronic (4 weeks) erythritol consumption. Acute erythritol improved endothelial function measured by fingertip peripheral arterial tonometry (0.52 ± 0.48 to 0.87 ± 0.29 au, P = 0.005). Chronic erythritol decreased central pulse pressure (47 ± 13 to 41 ± 9 mmHg, P = 0.02) and tended to decrease carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (P = 0.06). Thus, erythritol consumption acutely improved small vessel endothelial function, and chronic treatment reduced central aortic stiffness. Erythritol may be a preferred sugar substitute for patients with diabetes mellitus.

Keywords

Diabetes mellitus Endothelium Arterial stiffness Dietary supplements 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by a grant from Cargill, Inc. Dr. Dorsey is supported by T32 HL007224. Drs. LeLeiko, Hamburg, and Vita receive support from the NIH-sponsored Boston University Medical Center Leadership Program in Vascular Medicine (K12 HL083781). Dr. Hamburg is also supported by NIH grants HL102299 and Dr. Vita also receives support from NIH grants HL081587, HL083801, HL083269, and HL115391.

Conflict of interest

None.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nir Flint
    • 1
  • Naomi M. Hamburg
    • 1
  • Monika Holbrook
    • 1
  • Pamela G. Dorsey
    • 1
  • Rebecca M. LeLeiko
    • 1
  • Alvin Berger
    • 2
  • Peter de Cock
    • 3
  • Douwina Bosscher
    • 3
  • Joseph A. Vita
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Evans Department of Medicine and Whitaker Cardiovascular InstituteBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  2. 2.Cargill Global Food ResearchWayzataUSA
  3. 3.Cargill R&D Centre EuropeVilvoordeBelgium

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