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European Spine Journal

, Volume 23, Issue 10, pp 2221–2222 | Cite as

Answer to the Letter to the Editor of S. Negrini et al. concerning “Active self-correction and task-oriented exercises reduce spinal deformity and improve quality of life in subjects with mild adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Results of a randomised controlled trial” by Monticone M, Ambrosini E, Cazzaniga D, Rocca B, Ferrante S (2014) Eur Spine J; DOI 10.1007/s00586-014-3241-y

  • Marco Monticone
Letter to the Editor

Keywords

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Motor Performance Idiopathic Scoliosis Cobb Angle Spinal Deformity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

None of the authors has any potential conflict of interest.

References

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    Monticone M, Ambrosini E, Cazzaniga D, Rocca B, Ferrante S (2014) Active self-correction and task-oriented exercises reduce spinal deformity and improve quality of life in subjects with mild adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Results of a randomised controlled trial. Eur Spine J 23(6):1204–1214PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Unit, Scientific Institute of Lissone, Salvatore Maugeri FoundationInstitute of Care and Research, IRCCSMilanItaly

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