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European Spine Journal

, Volume 23, Issue 10, pp 2218–2220 | Cite as

Letter to the Editor concerning: “Active self-correction and task-oriented exercises reduce spinal deformity and improve quality of life in subjects with mild adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Results of a randomised controlled trial” by Monticone M, Ambrosini E, Cazzaniga D, Rocca B, Ferrante S (2014). Eur Spine J; DOI:10.1007/s00586-014-3241-y

  • Stefano Negrini
  • Josette Bettany-Saltikov
  • Jean Claude De Mauroy
  • Jacek Durmala
  • Theodoros B. Grivas
  • Patrick Knott
  • Tomasz Kotwicki
  • Toru Maruyama
  • Joseph P. O’Brien
  • Eric Parent
  • Manuel Rigo
  • Michele Romano
  • Luke Stikeleather
  • Monica Villagrasa
  • Fabio Zaina
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

We would like to compliment the authors for their work [1], which is a milestone in research on the exercise-based approach for Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS). We have two specific questions, and some general comments from the perspective of the international Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT).

Since 2004, SOSORT has been working to verify the efficacy of various conservative non-surgical approaches (mainly bracing and exercises) [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. Systematic reviews have been published stating the efficacy of the exercise approach [7], while others raised criticisms [8]. Recently, a Cochrane review was published [9, 10] based on only two papers with study designs of sufficient quality to meet the strong methodological requirements of the Cochrane Institute [11]. One paper was a very low quality Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) [12], favoring exercises for AIS. Now, this new RCT is going to strengthen the evidence supporting...

Keywords

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Idiopathic Scoliosis Risser Sign Stringent Selection Criterion Standard Error Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

None.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefano Negrini
    • 1
    • 2
  • Josette Bettany-Saltikov
    • 3
  • Jean Claude De Mauroy
    • 4
  • Jacek Durmala
    • 5
  • Theodoros B. Grivas
    • 6
  • Patrick Knott
    • 7
  • Tomasz Kotwicki
    • 8
  • Toru Maruyama
    • 9
  • Joseph P. O’Brien
    • 10
  • Eric Parent
    • 11
  • Manuel Rigo
    • 12
  • Michele Romano
    • 13
  • Luke Stikeleather
    • 14
  • Monica Villagrasa
    • 12
  • Fabio Zaina
    • 13
  1. 1.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental SciencesUniversity of BresciaBresciaItaly
  2. 2.IRCCS Don Gnocchi MilanMilanItaly
  3. 3.Teesside University, Research Institute of Health and Social CareMiddlesbroughUK
  4. 4.Clinique du ParcLyonFrance
  5. 5.Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health SciencesMedical University of SilesiaKatowicePoland
  6. 6.Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department“Tzaneio” General Hospital of PiraeusPiraeusGreece
  7. 7.Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and ScienceNorth ChicagoUSA
  8. 8.Spine Disorders Unit, Department of Pediatric Orthopedics and TraumatologyUniversity of Medical SciencesPoznanPoland
  9. 9.Saitama Medical UnversitySaitamaJapan
  10. 10.National Scoliosis FoundationBostonUSA
  11. 11.Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Physical TherapyUniversity of AlbertaAlbertaCanada
  12. 12.Institut Elena Salvá.BarcelonaSpain
  13. 13.ISICO (Italian Scientific Spine Institute)MilanItaly
  14. 14.Scoliosis Solutions, LLCFairfaxUSA

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