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European Spine Journal

, Volume 23, Supplement 1, pp 40–54 | Cite as

Experience of a fellowship in spinal surgery: a quantitative analysis

  • Wojciech Konczalik
  • Sherief Elsayed
  • Bronek Boszczyk
Original Article

Abstract

Objectives

The objective of our paper was to ascertain the self-reported competency level of surgeons who had completed a 1-year spine fellowship versus those who had not. Our secondary objective was to determine whether there was any difference between orthopaedic and neurosurgeons.

Methods

A 60 question online questionnaire was provided to AOSpine Europe members for completion online.

Results

289 members provided a response, of which 64 % were orthopaedic surgeons and 31 % neurosurgeons (5 % did not specify). Eighty (28 %) had completed a 1-year fellowship. Theoretical and practical knowledge of the management of spinal deformity was the greatest difference seen upon completing a fellowship. Multiple elective and emergent conditions were demonstrated to have a significant difference upon completion of a fellowship. There was no difference between orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons.

Conclusions

In order to provide an efficient and safe service covering the broad spectrum of spinal pathology, a formal spine fellowship, ideally with a formal curriculum, should be considered.

Keywords

Spine Fellowship Training Complications Assessment 

Notes

Acknowledgments

AOSpine; Jim Hegarty (senior data administrator; Centre for Spinal Studies and Surgery, Nottingham University Hospitals). No funding or grants were provided for this paper.

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wojciech Konczalik
    • 1
  • Sherief Elsayed
    • 2
  • Bronek Boszczyk
    • 2
  1. 1.University of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  2. 2.Centre for Spinal Studies and SurgeryQueens Medical CentreNottinghamUK

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