European Spine Journal

, Volume 20, Issue 12, pp 2134–2142

Long-term effectiveness of a back education programme in elementary schoolchildren: an 8-year follow-up study

  • Mieke Dolphens
  • Barbara Cagnie
  • Lieven Danneels
  • Dirk De Clercq
  • Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
  • Greet Cardon
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00586-011-1856-9

Cite this article as:
Dolphens, M., Cagnie, B., Danneels, L. et al. Eur Spine J (2011) 20: 2134. doi:10.1007/s00586-011-1856-9

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term effectiveness of a spine care education programme conducted in 9- to 11-year-old schoolchildren. The study sample included 96 intervention subjects and 98 controls (9- to 11-year-olds at baseline). Intervention consisted of a 6-week school-based back education programme (predominantly biomechanically oriented) and was implemented by a physical therapist. Self-reported outcomes on back care knowledge, spinal care behaviour, self-efficacy towards favourable back care behaviour, prevalence of back and neck pain during the week and fear-avoidance beliefs were evaluated by the use of questionnaires. Post-tests were performed within 1 week after programme completion, after 1 year and after 8 years. Whereas the educational back care programme resulted in increased back care knowledge up to adulthood (P < 0.001), intervention did not change spinal care behaviour or self-efficacy. Pain prevalence figures increased less in the experimental group compared to the controls over the 8-year time span, yet statistical significance was not reached. Dropout analysis revealed spinal pain prevalence rates to be different in both groups throughout the study, including at baseline. Back education at young age did not reinforce fear-avoidance beliefs up to adulthood. Predominantly biomechanical oriented back education in elementary schoolchildren is effective in improving the cognitive aspect of back care up to adulthood, yet not in changing actual behaviour or self-efficacy. The current study does not provide evidence that educational back care programmes have any impact on spinal pain in adulthood. The true long-term impact of school-based spinal health interventions on clinically relevant outcome measures merits further attention.

Keywords

Education Back pain Child Prevention and control 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mieke Dolphens
    • 1
  • Barbara Cagnie
    • 1
  • Lieven Danneels
    • 1
  • Dirk De Clercq
    • 2
  • Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
    • 2
  • Greet Cardon
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and PhysiotherapyGhent UniversityGhentBelgium
  2. 2.Department of Movement and Sport SciencesGhent UniversityGhentBelgium

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