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Clinical pathological findings of a cat with chronic cholangitis

  • A. A. Ikhwan-SaufiEmail author
  • R. Ahmad-Rasul
  • H. X. Liew
  • M. Y. Lim
  • T. Adeline
  • R. Nuhanim
  • M. Daarulmuqaamah
  • A. Amlizawaty
  • M. Maizatul-Akmal
  • J. Johaimi
  • A. Rasedee
  • M. I. Mahiza
  • A. A. Azlina
  • H. HazilawatiEmail author
Case Report
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Abstract

Chronic cholangitis in cats can be induced by liver fluke infestation. It is a rare disease and can be fatal if it is left untreated due to a number of complications including liver cancer. A 2.5-year-old–spayed female domestic shorthair cat with history of jaundice, vomiting and self-inflicted alopecia was brought to the University Veterinary Hospital. Blood and urine samples were sent to the Veterinary Haematology and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory. Complete blood count results showed values within normal. The cat rather had persistent increases in liver enzymes and bilirubin throughout 1 week of hospitalisation, although she was treated empirically. Bilirubinuria was expected, and adequately concentrated urine was noted. Faecal sample submitted to the Veterinary Parasitology Laboratory during hospitalisation revealed the presence of liver fluke ova. The cat was treated with fenbendazole and other medications upon discharged, and the owner was advised to bring the cat for a visit for re-evaluation of liver enzymes and liver fluke ova.

Keywords

Alanine aminotransferase Alkaline phosphatase Bilirubinuria Gamma-glutamyl transferase Platynosomum sp 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank all staff and students at Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia who involved directly or indirectly in taking care of the cat.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. A. Ikhwan-Saufi
    • 1
    Email author
  • R. Ahmad-Rasul
    • 1
  • H. X. Liew
    • 1
  • M. Y. Lim
    • 1
  • T. Adeline
    • 2
  • R. Nuhanim
    • 2
  • M. Daarulmuqaamah
    • 2
  • A. Amlizawaty
    • 3
  • M. Maizatul-Akmal
    • 2
  • J. Johaimi
    • 2
    • 4
  • A. Rasedee
    • 3
  • M. I. Mahiza
    • 2
  • A. A. Azlina
    • 2
  • H. Hazilawati
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.University Veterinary Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversiti Putra MalaysiaSerdangMalaysia
  2. 2.Veterinary Clinical Pathology, Haematology and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversiti Putra MalaysiaSerdangMalaysia
  3. 3.Department of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnostics, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversiti Putra MalaysiaSerdangMalaysia
  4. 4.Sabah Animal Medical CentreBangiMalaysia

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