Mycorrhiza

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 207–212

Biodegradation of phenanthrene, spatial distribution of bacterial populations and dioxygenase expression in the mycorrhizosphere of Lolium perenne inoculated with Glomus mosseae

  • S. C. Corgié
  • F. Fons
  • T. Beguiristain
  • C. Leyval
Short Note

DOI: 10.1007/s00572-006-0049-6

Cite this article as:
Corgié, S.C., Fons, F., Beguiristain, T. et al. Mycorrhiza (2006) 16: 207. doi:10.1007/s00572-006-0049-6

Abstract

Interactions between the plant and its microbial communities in the rhizosphere control microbial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) biodegradation processes. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can influence plant survival and PAH degradation in polluted soil. This work was aimed at studying the contribution of the mycorrhizosphere to PAH biodegradation in the presence of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L., cv. Barclay) inoculated with Glomus mosseae (BEG 69) by taking into account the structure and activity of bacterial communities, PAH degrading culturable bacteria as a function of the distance from roots. Ryegrass was grown in compartmentalized systems designed to harvest successive sections of rhizosphere in lateral compartments polluted or not with phenanthrene (PHE). Colonization of roots by G. mosseae (BEG 69) modified the structure and density of bacterial populations in the mycorrhizosphere, compared to the rhizosphere of non-mycorrhizal plants. G. mosseae increased the density of culturable heterotrophic and PAH degrading bacteria beyond the immediate rhizosphere in the presence of PHE, and increased the density of PAH degraders in the absence of the pollutant. Biodegradation was not significantly increased in the mycorrhizosphere, compared to control non-mycorrhizal plants, where PHE biodegradation already reached 92% after 6 weeks. However, dioxygenase transcriptional activity was found to be higher in the immediate mycorrhizosphere in the presence of G. mosseae (BEG 69).

Keywords

AM fungi Bacterial community Biodegradation Glomus mosseae Phenanthrene Naphthalene dioxygenase 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. C. Corgié
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Fons
    • 1
  • T. Beguiristain
    • 1
  • C. Leyval
    • 1
  1. 1.CNRS-UHP Nancy I, LIMOS (Laboratoire des Interactions Microorganismes-Minéraux-Matière Organique dans les Sols), UMR 7137Faculté des SciencesVandoeuvre-les-Nancy CédexFrance
  2. 2.Biological and Environmental EngineeringCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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