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Microsystem Technologies

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 245–255 | Cite as

A micro vertically-allocated SU-8 check valve and its characteristics

  • Zebing Mao
  • Kazuhiro Yoshida
  • Joon-wan KimEmail author
Technical Paper
  • 92 Downloads

Abstract

This paper proposes and develops a novel fabrication method to realize a micro vertically-allocated SU-8 check valve. The ordinary vertically-allocated SU-8 check valve formed by the photolithography has a limited overlap between an SU-8 cantilever and its valve seat, resulting in the low diodicity (i.e. the ratio of the forward flow to reverse flow rates). This overlap prevents the leakage through a bottom gap (a gap between a substrate and the SU-8 cantilever) and a top gap (a gap between a cover plate and the SU-8 cantilever) in the backward flow. These gaps, which are necessary for the movement of the SU-8 cantilever in the forward flow, must cause the leakage of check valves in the backward flow. To reduce the leakage and improve the diodicity, we propose to fabricate a novel fully-overlapped valve seat composed of channel walls, a bottom block, and a top block. To keep the advantages on the batch process of vertically-allocated SU-8 check valves, these blocks are desirable to be fabricated by the multi-layer process. We propose a multi-layer process for the bottom block and a novel beam forming process (a dose-controlled UV exposure) for the top block. In this paper, we design two types of check valves: (a) the ordinary partially-overlapped check valve; and (b) the proposed fully-overlapped check valve, to compare their diodicity. By investigating their flow rate characteristics experimentally, we conclude that the fully-overlapped check valve can reduce the leakage of 53.6% compared with the partially-overlapped check valve and increase the diodicity from 1.7 to 3.5 (about 2 times) at the supplied pressure of 18 kPa. We also demonstrate that the novel check valve exhibits higher performance and also show that our fully-overlapped check valve can be potentially applied to various microfluidics.

Notes

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of EngineeringTokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Laboratory for Future Interdisciplinary Research of Science and Technology (FIRST)Tokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohamaJapan

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