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A circular microchannel with integrated electrodes for DNA electrophoresis

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Abstract

The development of a novel microfluidic device that includes a circular microchannel and integrated electrodes for DNA electrophoresis is reported. The geometry of the separation channel and the arrangement of the embedded electrodes provide several advantages in relation to conventional linear microchannels. The paper describe the design, modeling, construction, and testing of the micro device. Numerical simulations were used to investigate the electric field into the microchannel. In addition, the electrophoretic transport of DNA samples was studied under different voltage configurations. The experiments reported show the functionality of the device, and illustrate interesting features of DNA transport.

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Acknowledgments

CLAB thanks the financial support from CONICET (PIP 0317) and Universidad Nacional del Litoral (CAI + D65/328), Argentina. We would like to thank M.J. Dieguez, F. Sacco and E.M. Salmoral for technical advice and discussion.

Author information

Correspondence to B. Lerner.

Electronic supplementary material

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Supplementary material S1 The video shows a fluorescence microscopy of DNA migration from a negative electrode. A volume element of DNA was situated on electrode 2, and then a potential difference of 3 V was applied between electrodes 1 and 2, as well as between electrodes 2 and 3, as shown schematically in Fig. 13a. (MPG 1076 kb)

Supplementary material S2 The video shows a fluorescence microscopy of DNA adsorption on positive electrode. A volume element of DNA was situated between electrodes 1 and 2, and then a potential difference of 3 V was applied between them, as shown in Fig. 14a. (MPG 470 kb)

Supplementary material S3 The video shows a fluorescence microscopy of DNA migration over a neutral electrode. A volume element of DNA was situated between electrodes 1 and 2, and then a potential difference of 3 V was applied between electrodes 1 and 3, as shown in Fig. 15a. (MPG 946 kb)

Supplementary material S1 The video shows a fluorescence microscopy of DNA migration from a negative electrode. A volume element of DNA was situated on electrode 2, and then a potential difference of 3 V was applied between electrodes 1 and 2, as well as between electrodes 2 and 3, as shown schematically in Fig. 13a. (MPG 1076 kb)

Supplementary material S2 The video shows a fluorescence microscopy of DNA adsorption on positive electrode. A volume element of DNA was situated between electrodes 1 and 2, and then a potential difference of 3 V was applied between them, as shown in Fig. 14a. (MPG 470 kb)

Supplementary material S3 The video shows a fluorescence microscopy of DNA migration over a neutral electrode. A volume element of DNA was situated between electrodes 1 and 2, and then a potential difference of 3 V was applied between electrodes 1 and 3, as shown in Fig. 15a. (MPG 946 kb)

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Lerner, B., Kler, P.A., Ordoñez Arias, A.F. et al. A circular microchannel with integrated electrodes for DNA electrophoresis. Microsyst Technol 19, 733–742 (2013) doi:10.1007/s00542-012-1678-7

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Keywords

  • PDMS
  • Field Line
  • Separation Channel
  • Circular Channel
  • Injection Zone