Microsystem Technologies

, Volume 17, Issue 5–7, pp 1003–1007 | Cite as

Characterization of slider-lubricant interaction with tribo-current

  • Yijun Man
  • Bo Liu
  • Shengbin Hu
  • Yansheng Ma
  • Kaidong Ye
  • Sujeet Kumar Sinha
  • Seh Chun Lim
Technical Paper

Abstract

Lube-surfing recording combined with thermal fly-height control (TFC) technology is considered as a promising head-disk interface (HDI) scheme for further increasing magnetic areal density to 5–10 Tbits/in2. To realize this alternative technology, however, a lot of tricky issues are required to be solved. Among them, how to characterize the flying of slider in the lubricant or light lube-contact by the slider is probably one of the tough but inevitable challenges. In this study, the slider/lubricant/disk contact induced tribo-current is investigated with a modified media-tester in which the TFC slider is electrically isolated with the rest of the tester. The measured tribo-currents versus the heater voltages or the powers to the slider’s heater clearly indicate three different intensity regions of tribo-current, by which the three different contact types, namely, non-contact, lube-contact and solid-contact can be differentiated clearly. This method provides a promising way for accurately studying of lube-surfing recording.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yijun Man
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bo Liu
    • 1
  • Shengbin Hu
    • 1
  • Yansheng Ma
    • 1
  • Kaidong Ye
    • 1
  • Sujeet Kumar Sinha
    • 2
  • Seh Chun Lim
    • 2
  1. 1.Data Storage InstituteAgency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)SingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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