Microsystem Technologies

, Volume 13, Issue 5–6, pp 517–522 | Cite as

Polymeric microneedle fabrication using a microinjection molding technique

  • Firas Sammoura
  • JeongJin Kang
  • Young-Moo Heo
  • TaeSung Jung
  • Liwei Lin
Technical paper

Abstract

Polymeric microneedles fabricated by microinjection molding techniques have been demonstrated using Topas®COC as the molding plastic material. Open-channel microneedles with cross-sectional area of 100 μm × 100 μm were designed and fabricated on top of a shank of 4.7 mm in length, 0.6 mm in width, and 0.5 mm in depth. The tip of the microneedle has a round shape with a radius of 125 μm as limited by the drill used in fabricating the mold insert. The injection molding parameters including clamping force, shot size, injection velocity, packing pressure, and temperature were characterized in order to achieve best reproducibility. Experimentally, a fabricated microneedle was successfully injected into a chicken leg and a beef liver freshly bought from a local supermarket and about 0.04 μL of liquid was drawn from these tissues immediately. This new technology allows mass production of microneedles at a low cost for potential biomedical applications.

Notes

Ackowledgements

This project is supported in part by a grant from Korea Institute of Industrial Technology and an NSF award DMI0428884. The mold insert was fabricated in the UC-Berkeley Mechanical Engineering Machine Shop with the assistance of Mr. John Morton and the authors would like to thank Mr. Ron Wilson for taking SEM pictures.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Firas Sammoura
    • 1
  • JeongJin Kang
    • 2
  • Young-Moo Heo
    • 2
  • TaeSung Jung
    • 3
  • Liwei Lin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH)Kyunggi-doRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.JYSolutecInchonRepublic of Korea

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