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Journal of Anesthesia

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 303–307 | Cite as

A retrospective comparative provider workload analysis for femoral nerve and adductor canal catheters following knee arthroplasty

  • Michael Rasmussen
  • Eugenia Kim
  • T. Edward Kim
  • Steven K. Howard
  • Seshadri Mudumbai
  • Nicholas J. Giori
  • Steven Woolson
  • Toni Ganaway
  • Edward R. MarianoEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

Adductor canal catheters preserve quadriceps strength better than femoral nerve catheters and may facilitate postoperative ambulation following total knee arthroplasty. However, the effect of this newer technique on provider workload, if any, is unknown. We conducted a retrospective provider workload analysis comparing these two catheter techniques; all other aspects of the clinical pathway remained the same. The primary outcome was number of interventions recorded per patient postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included infusion duration, ambulation distance, opioid consumption, and hospital length of stay. Adductor canal patients required a median (10–90th percentiles) of 0.0 (0.0–2.6) interventions compared to 1.0 (0.3–3.0) interventions for femoral patients (p < 0.001); 18/23 adductor canal patients (78 %) compared to 2/22 femoral patients (9 %) required no interventions (p < 0.001). Adductor canal catheter infusions lasted 2.0 (1.4–2.0) days compared to 1.5 (1.0–2.7) days in the femoral group (p = 0.016). Adductor canal patients ambulated further [mean (SD)] than femoral patients on postoperative day 1 [24.5 (21.7) vs. 11.9 (14.6) meters, respectively; p = 0.030] and day 2 [44.9 (26.3) vs. 22.0 (22.2) meters, respectively; p = 0.003]. Postoperative opioid consumption and length of stay were similar between groups. We conclude that adductor canal catheters offer both patient and provider benefits when compared to femoral nerve catheters.

Keywords

Adductor canal block Femoral nerve block Total knee arthroplasty Workload Perineural infusion 

Notes

Conflict of interest

Dr. Mariano has received unrestricted educational program funding paid to his institution from I-Flow/Kimberly-Clark (Lake Forest, CA, USA) and B Braun (Bethlehem, PA, USA). These companies had no input into any aspect of the present study design and implementation; data collection, analysis and interpretation; or manuscript preparation. None of the other authors has any personal financial interests to disclose.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists (outside the USA) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Rasmussen
    • 1
    • 4
  • Eugenia Kim
    • 1
    • 4
  • T. Edward Kim
    • 2
    • 4
  • Steven K. Howard
    • 2
    • 4
  • Seshadri Mudumbai
    • 2
    • 4
  • Nicholas J. Giori
    • 3
  • Steven Woolson
    • 3
  • Toni Ganaway
    • 2
    • 4
  • Edward R. Mariano
    • 2
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Regional Anesthesiology and Acute Pain Medicine FellowDepartment of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  4. 4.Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care SystemPalo AltoUSA

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