Journal of Anesthesia

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 292–295 | Cite as

Epidrum®: a new device to identify the epidural space with an epidural Tuohy needle

  • Atsushi Sawada
  • Natsumi Kii
  • Yusuke Yoshikawa
  • Michiaki Yamakage
Short Communication

Abstract

Epidrum® is an optimal pressure, loss of resistance device for identifying the epidural space. We investigated the usefulness of Epidrum versus the loss of resistance or hanging drop techniques while performing epidural anesthesia. Eighty adult patients who were scheduled for elective surgery under lumbar epidural anesthesia were randomized into two groups. The first group (Epidrum group) consisted of 40 adult patients who were scheduled for epidural anesthesia using Epidrum. The second group (control group) consisted of 40 adult patients who were scheduled for epidural anesthesia using the loss of resistance or hanging drop technique. We recorded the time required to identify the epidural space and outcomes of epidural catheterization. The attending anesthesiologists were also questioned regarding the ease of control of the Tuohy needle and of epidural space identification with each method. The time required to perform epidural anesthesia was significantly shorter in the Epidrum group than in the control group [28 s (10–76) vs. 90 s (34–185); median (interquartile range)] (p < 0.05). Tuohy needle control was significantly easier in the Epidrum group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Epidrum is useful for performing epidural anesthesia quickly while obtaining good Tuohy needle control.

Keywords

Epidural space Tuohy needle Epidrum® 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atsushi Sawada
    • 1
  • Natsumi Kii
    • 1
  • Yusuke Yoshikawa
    • 1
  • Michiaki Yamakage
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologySapporo Medical University School of MedicineSapporoJapan

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