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Journal of Anesthesia

, Volume 24, Issue 4, pp 569–574 | Cite as

Hydrogen-rich saline solution attenuates renal ischemia–reperfusion injury

  • Chihiro Shingu
  • Hironori Koga
  • Satoshi Hagiwara
  • Shigekiyo Matsumoto
  • Koji Goto
  • Isao Yokoi
  • Takayuki Noguchi
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

Renal ischemia–reperfusion (I/R), an important cause of acute kidney injury, is unavoidable during various types of operations, including renal transplantation, surgical revascularization of the renal artery, partial nephrectomy, and treatment of suprarenal aortic aneurysms. Exacerbation of I/R injury is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). A recent study has shown that hydrogen has antioxidant properties. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a hydrogen-rich saline solution (HRSS) attenuates renal I/R injury in a rodent model.

Methods

Rats were treated with an intravenous injection of HRSS or control saline solution followed by renal I/R. After 24 h of treatment, we performed a histological examination and transmission electron microscopy, and measured serum levels of 8-OHdG.

Results

Histological analysis revealed a marked reduction of interstitial congestion, edema, inflammation, and hemorrhage in renal tissue harvested 24 h after HRSS treatment compared to saline administration. Renal I/R injury, which led to altered mitochondrial morphology, was also inhibited by HRSS. Furthermore, serum 8-OHdG levels were significantly lower in rats treated with HRSS and subjected to renal I/R.

Conclusions

These protective effects were likely due to the antioxidant properties of HRSS. These results suggest that HRSS is a potential therapeutic candidate for treating various I/R diseases.

Keywords

Hydrogen 8-OHdG Saline solution Ischemia–reperfusion injury Renal 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Hiroaki Kawazato and Aiko Yasuda for their helpful advice on the preparation of kidney tissue specimens. We also thank Dr. Tomohisa Uchida for scoring renal histology. This study was supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Kakenhi).

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chihiro Shingu
    • 1
  • Hironori Koga
    • 1
  • Satoshi Hagiwara
    • 1
  • Shigekiyo Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Koji Goto
    • 1
  • Isao Yokoi
    • 2
  • Takayuki Noguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care MedicineOita University Faculty of MedicineYufuJapan
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyOita University Faculty of MedicineYufuJapan

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