International Journal of Earth Sciences

, Volume 103, Issue 4, pp 1141–1161 | Cite as

Mid-Quaternary decoupling of sediment routing in the Nankai Forearc revealed by provenance analysis of turbiditic sands

  • Muhammed O. Usman
  • Hideki Masago
  • Wilfried Winkler
  • Michael Strasser
Original Paper

Abstract

Coring during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 315, 316, and 333 recovered turbiditic sands from the forearc Kumano Basin (Site C0002), a Quaternary slope basin (Site C0018), and uplifted trench wedge (Site C0006) along the Kumano Transect of the Nankai Trough accretionary wedge offshore of southwest Japan. The compositions of the submarine turbiditic sands here are investigated in terms of bulk and heavy mineral modal compositions to identify their provenance and dispersal mechanisms, as they may reflect changes in regional tectonics during the past ca. 1.5 Myrs. The results show a marked change in the detrital signature and heavy mineral composition in the forearc and slope basin facies around 1 Ma. This sudden change is interpreted to reflect a major change in the sand provenance, rather than heavy mineral dissolution and/or diagenetic effects, in response to changing tectonics and sedimentation patterns. In the trench-slope basin, the sands older than 1 Ma were probably eroded from the exposed Cretaceous–Tertiary accretionary complex of the Shimanto Belt and transported via the former course of the Tenryu submarine canyon system, which today enters the Nankai Trough northeast of the study area. In contrast, the high abundance of volcanic lithics and volcanic heavy mineral suites of the sands younger than 1 Ma points to a strong volcanic component of sediment derived from the Izu-Honshu collision zones and probably funnelled to this site through the Suruga Canyon. However, sands in the forearc basin show persistent presence of blue sodic amphiboles across the 1 Ma boundary, indicating continuous flux of sediments from the Kumano/Kinokawa River. This implies that the sands in the older turbidites were transported by transverse flow down the slope. The slope basin facies then switched to reflect longitudinal flow around 1 Ma, when the turbiditic sand tapped a volcanic provenance in the Izu-Honshu collision zone, while the sediments transported transversely became confined in the Kumano Basin. Therefore, the change in the depositional systems around 1 Ma is a manifestation of the decoupling of the sediment routing pattern from transverse to long-distance axial flow in response to forearc high uplift along the megasplay fault.

Keywords

Sand provenance Nankai Trough NanTroSEIZE Kumano Basin Accretionary wedge Sediment routing 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research used samples provided by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Special thanks to Frowin Pirovino for the thin sections preparation. The river sand samples were collected mostly by high school students as a part of the “Sand for Students” outreach programmes promoted by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). This research project is supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation Grant PP00P2-133481.

 Data are archived in www.pangaea.de (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.830343).

References

  1. Amano K (1991) Multiple collision tectonics of the South Fossa Magna in central Japan. Mod Geol 15:315–329Google Scholar
  2. Andò S, Garzanti E, Padoan M, Limonta M (2012) Corrosion of heavy minerals during weathering and diagenesis: a catalog for optical analysis. Sediment Geol 280:165–178CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Aoki K, Itaya T, Shibuya T, Masago H, Kon Y, Terabayashi M, Kaneko Y, Kawai T, Maruyama S (2008) The youngest blueschist belt in SW Japan: implication for the exhumation of the Cretaceous Sanbagawa high-P⁄T metamorphic belt. J Metamorph Geol 26:583–602CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bangs NLB, Moore GF, Gulick SPS, Pangborn EM, Tobin HJ, Kuramoto S, Taira A (2009) Broad, weak regions of the Nankai Megathrust and implications for shallow coseismic slip. Earth Planet Sci Lett 284(1–2):44–49CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Basu A, McKay D, Gerke T (1988) Petrology and provenance of Apollo 15 drive tube 15007/8. Proceedings of the eighteenth lunar and planetary science conference (S. 283–298). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 283–298Google Scholar
  6. Blum P, Okamura Y (1992) Pre-Holocene sediment dispersal systems and effects of structural controls and Holocene sea-level rise from acoustic facies analysis; SW Japan forearc. Mar Geol 108:295–322CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Clift PD, Carter A, Nicholson U, Masago H (2013) Zircon and apatite thermochronology of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism and trench, Japan: sediment transport in an active and collisional margin setting. Tectonics 32:377–395CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Critelli S, Le Pera E, Ingersoll RV (1997) The effects of source lithology, transport, deposition and sampling scale on the composition of southern California sands. Sedimentology 44:653–671CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. De Rosa R, Zuffa GG, Taira A, Leggett JK (1986) Petrography of trench sands from the Nankai Trough, southwest Japan: implications for long-distance turbidite transportation. Geol Mag 123:477–486CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Dickinson WR (1970) Interpreting detrital modes of graywacke and arkose. J Sediment Petrol 40:695–707Google Scholar
  11. Dickinson WR (1985) Interpreting provenance relations from detrital modes of sandstones. In: Zuffa GG (ed) Provenance of arenites (NATO ASI Series, Series C, 148). D. Riedel, Massachusetts, pp 333–361CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Fergusson CL (2003) Provenance of Miocene–Pleistocene turbidite sands and sandstones, Nankai Trough, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 190. In: Mikada H, Moore GF, Taira A, Becker K, Moore JC, Klaus A (eds) Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Report 190/196. Reports 338. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management International Incorporation, Washington, pp 1–28Google Scholar
  13. Folk RL (1968) Petrology of sedimentary rocks. Hemphill’s, Austin, p 183Google Scholar
  14. Gabriel A, Cox EP (1929) A staining method for the quantitative determination of certain rock minerals. Am Mineral 68:290–292Google Scholar
  15. Garzanti E, Andò S (2007a) Plate tectonics and heavy mineral suites of modern sands. Dev Sedimentol 58:741–763CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Garzanti E, Andò S (2007b) Heavy mineral concentration in modern sands: implications for provenance interpretation. Dev Sedimentol 58:507–545Google Scholar
  17. Garzanti E, Andò S, Vezzoli G, Dell’Era D (2003) From rifted margins to foreland basins: investigating provenance and sediment dispersal across desert Arabia (Oman, U.A.E.). J Sediment Res 73(4):572–588CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Garzanti E, Andò S, Vezzoli G, Lustrino M, Boni M, Vermeesch P (2012) Petrology of the Namib Sand Sea: long-distance transport and compositional variability in the wind-displaced Orange Delta. Earth Sci Rev 112:173–189CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Gulick SPS, Bangs NLB, Moore GF, Ashi J, Martin KM, Sawyer DS, Tobin HJ, Kuramoto S, Taira A (2010) Rapid forearc basin uplift and megasplay fault development from 3D seismic images of Nankai Margin off Kii Peninsula, Japan. Earth Planet Sci Lett 300(1–2):55–62CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Hasebe N, Tagami T, Nishimura S (1993) The evidence of along-arc differential uplift of the Shimanto accretionary complex: fission track thermochronology of the Kumano Acidic Rocks, Southwest Japan. Tectonophysics 224:327–335CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Haughton PDW, Todd SP, Morton AC (1991) Sedimentary provenance studies. In: Morton AC, Todd SP, Haughton PDW (eds) Developments in sedimentary provenance studies. Geological Society of London Special Publications 57, London, pp 1–11Google Scholar
  22. Higashino T (1990) The higher grade metamorphic zonation of the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt in central Shikoku, Japan. J Metamorph Geol 8:413–423CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Houghton HF (1980) Refined techniques for staining plagioclase and alkali feldspars in thin section. J Sediment Petrol 50:629–931CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Hubert JF (1962) A zircon–tourmaline–rutile maturity index and the interdependence of the composition of heavy minerals assemblages with the gross composition and texture of sandstones. J Sediment Petrol 32(3):440–450Google Scholar
  25. Ingersoll RV (1990) Actualistic sandstone petrofacies: discriminating modern and ancient source rocks. Geology 18:733–736CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Kamata H, Kodama K (1999) Volcanic history and tectonics of the Southwest Japan Arc. Isl Arc 8:393–403CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Karig DE, Sharman GF (1975) Subduction and accretion in trenches. Geol Soc Am Bull 86:377–389CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Karig DE, Ingle JC, Haile N, Bouma AH, Moore JC, White SM, MacGregor I, Ellis H, Ujiie H, Ling HY, Koizumi I, Watanabe T, Yasui M (1975). In: Karig DE, Ingle JC (eds) Initial reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Program Leg 31. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, pp 927Google Scholar
  29. Kimura JI, Stern RJ, Yoshida T (2005) Reinitiation of subduction and magmatic responses in SW Japan during Neogene time. Geol Soc Am Bull 117:969–986CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Mahony SH, Wallace LM, Miyoshi M, Villamor P, Sparks RSJ, Hasenaka T (2011) Volcano-tectonic interactions during rapid plate-boundary evolution in the Kyushu region, SW Japan. Geol Soc Am Bull 123(11/12):2201–2223CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Mange MA, Maurer HFW (1992) Heavy minerals in colour. Chapman and Hall, London, p 147CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Mange-Rajetzky M, Oberhaensli R (1982) Detrital lawsonite and blue sodic amphibole in the molasse of Savoy, France and their significance in assessing alpine evolution. Schweiz Miner Petrogr Mitt 62:415–436Google Scholar
  33. Marsaglia KM, Ingersoll RV, Packer BM (1992) Tectonic evolution of the Japanese Islands as reflected in modal compositions of Cenozoic forearc and backarc sand and sandstone. Tectonics 11(5):1028–1044CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Maruyama S, Isozaki Y, Kimura G, Terabayashi M (1997) Paleogeographic maps of the Japanese Islands: plate tectonic synthesis from 750 Ma to the present. Isl Arc 6:121–142CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. McLennan SM, Taylor SR, Eriksson KA (1983) Geochemistry of Archean shales from Pilbara Supergroup, Western Australia. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 47:1211–1222CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Milliken KL, Corner EE, Marsaglia KM (2012) Data report: modal sand composition at site C0004, C0006, C0007, and C0008, IODP Expedition 316, Nankai accretionary prism. In: Kinoshita M, Tobin HJ, Ashi J, Kimura G, Lallemant S, Screaton EJ, Curewitz D, Masago H, Moe KT, Expedition 314/315/316 Scientists (eds) Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program 314/315/316. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management International Incorporation, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  37. Moore JC, Mascle A, Taylor E, Andreieff P, Alvarez F, Barnes R, Beck C, Behrmann J, Blanc G, Brown K, Clark M, Dolan J, Fisher A, Gieskes J, Hounslow M, McLellan P, Moran K, Ogawa Y, Sakai T, Schoonmaker J, Vrolijk P, Wilkens R, Wiiliams C (1988) Tectonics and hydrogeology of the northern Barbados Ridge: results from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 110. Geol Soc Am Bull 100:1578–1593CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Moore GF, Taira A, Klaus A, Becker L, Boeckel B, Cragg BA, Dean A, Fergusson CL, Henry P, Hirano S, Hisamitsu T, Hunze S, Kastner M, Maltman AJ, Morgan JK, Murakami Y, Saffer DM, Sanchez-Gomez M, Screaton EJ, Smith DC, Spivack AJ, Steurer J, Tobin HJ, Ujiie K, Underwood MB, Wilson M (2001) New insights into deformation and fluid flow processes in the Nankai Trough accretionary prism: results of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 190. Geochem Geophys Geosyst 2(10):22CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Moore GF, Park JO, Bangs NL, Gulick SP, Tobin HJ, Nakamura Y, Sato S, Tsuji T, Yoro T, Tanaka H, Uraki S, Kido Y, Sanada Y, Kuramoto S, Taira A (2009) Structural and seismic stratigraphic framework of the NanTroSEIZE Stage 1 transect. In: Kinoshita M, Tobin H, Ashi J, Kimura G, Lallement S, Screaton EJ, Curewitz D, Masago H, Moe KT, Expedition 314/315/316 Scientists (eds) Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program 314/315/316. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management International Incorporation, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  40. Mouri K, Enami M (1988) Chemical compositions of minerals from the Kichijosan and Joyama complexes in the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, central Japan. Bull Nagoya Univ Mus 4:15–30 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  41. Nakajima T (1997) Regional metamorphic belts of the Japanese Islands. Isl Arc 6:69–90CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Nechaev VP, Isphording WC (1993) Heavy-mineral assemblages of continental margins as indicators of plate-tectonic environments. J Sediment Petrol 63(6):1110–1117Google Scholar
  43. Potter PE (1994) Modern sands of South America: composition, provenance and global significance. Geologische Rundshau 83:212–232CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Saito K, Kato K, Sugi S (1997) K-Ar dating studies of Ashigawa and Tokuwa granodiorite bodies and plutonic geochronology in the South Fossa Magna, central Japan. Isl Arc 6:158–167CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Expedition 314 Scientists (2009) Expedition 314 Site C0002. In: Kinoshita M, Tobin HJ, Ashi J, Kimura G, Lallemant S, Screaton EJ, Curewitz D, Masago H, Moe KT, Expedition 314/315/316 Scientists (eds) Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program 314/315/316. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management International Incorporation, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  46. Expedition 316 Scientists (2009a) Expedition 316 Site C0006. In: Kinoshita M, Tobin HJ, Ashi J, Kimura G, Lallemant S, Screaton EJ, Curewitz D, Masago H, Moe KT, Expedition 314/315/316 Scientists (eds) Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program 314/315/316. Integrated Ocean Drilliing Program Management International Incorporation, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  47. Expedition 316 Scientists (2009b) Expedition 316 Site C0004. In: Kinoshita M, Tobin HJ, Ashi J, Kimura G, Lallemant S, Screaton EJ, Curewitz D, Masago H, Moe KT, Expedition 314/315/316 Scientists (eds) Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program 314/315/316. Integrated Ocean Drilliing Program Management International Incorporation, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  48. Expedition 315 Scientists (2009) Expedition 315 Site C0002. In: Kinoshita M, Tobin HJ, Ashi J, Kimura G, Lallemant S, Screaton EJ, Curewitz D, Masago H, Moe KT, Expedition 314/315/316 Scientists (eds) Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program 314/315/316. Integrated Ocean Drilliing Program Management International Incorporation, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  49. Expedition 333 Scientists (2012). Expedition 333 Site C0018. In: Henry P, Kanamatsu T, Moe KT, Expedition 333 Scientists (eds) Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program 333. Integrated Ocean Drilliing Program Management International Incorporation, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  50. Expedition 338 Scientists (2013) NanTroSEIZE Stage 3: NanTroSEIZE plate boundary deep riser 2. In: Moore GF, Kanagawa K, Strasser M, Dugan B, Maeda L, Toczko S, Expedition 338 Scientists (eds) IODP Preliminary Reports 338. Integrated Ocean Drilliing Program Management International Incorporation, Washington DC, pp 81Google Scholar
  51. Screaton E, Kimura G, Curewitz D, Moore G, Chester F, Fabbri O, Fergusson C, Girault F, Goldsby D, Harris R, Inagaki F, Jiang T, Kitamura Y, Knuth M, Li CF, Claesson Liljedahl L, Louis L, Milliken K, Nicholson U, Riedinger N, Sakaguchi A, Solomon E, Strasser M, Su X, Tsutsumi A, Yamaguchi A, Ujiee K, Zhao X (2009) Interactions between deformation and fluids in the frontal thrust region of the NanTroSEIZE transect offshore the Kii Peninsula, Japan: results from IODP Expedition 316 Sites C0006 and C0007. Geochem Geophys Geosyst 10:14CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Seno T, Stein S, Gripp AE (1993) A model for the motion of the Philippine Sea plate consistent with NUVEL-1 and geological data. J Geophys Res 98:17941–17948CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Shipboard Scientific Party (2001) Leg 190 summary. In: Moore GF, Taira A, Klaus A, Becker L, Boeckel B (eds) Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, initial report 190. Ocean Drilling Program, College Station, p 87Google Scholar
  54. Strasser M, Moore GF, Kimura G, Kitamura Y, Kopf JA, Lallemant S, Park J, Screaton EJ, Su X, Underwood MB, Zhao X (2009) Origin and evolution of a splay fault in the Nankai accretionary wedge. Nat Geosci 2:648–652CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Strasser M, Moore GF, Kimura G, Kopf AJ, Underwood MB, Guo J, Screaton EJ (2011) Slumping and mass transport deposition in the Nankai fore arc: evidence from IODP drilling and 3-D reflection seismic data. Geochem Geophys Geosyst 12(5):24CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Strasser M, Henry P, Kanamatsu T, Thu MK, Moore GF, Expedition 333 Scientists (2012) Scientific drilling of mass-transport deposits in the Nankai accretionary wedge: first results from IODP expedition 333. In: Yamada Y, Kawamura K, Ikehara K, Ogawa Y, Urgeles R, Mosher D, Chaytor J, Strasser M (eds) Submarine mass movements and their consequences. Advances in Natural and Technological Hazard Research. Springer, Berlin, 31, pp 671–681Google Scholar
  57. Tagami T, Hasebe N, Shimada C (1995) Episodic exhumation of accretionary complexes: fission-track thermochronologic evidence from Shimanto Belt and its vicinities, southwest Japan. Isl Arc 4:209–230CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Taira A (2001) Tectonic evolution of the Japanese island arc system. Annu Rev Earth Planet Sci 29:109–134CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Taira A, Niitsuma N (1986) Turbidite sedimentation in the Nankai Trough as interpreted from magnetic fabric, grain size, and detrital mode analysis. In: Kagami H, Karig DE, Coulbourn WT, DSDP Leg 87 Scientists (eds) Initial report, Deep Sea Drilling Program, Leg 87. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, pp 611–632Google Scholar
  60. Taira A, Okada H, Whitaker JH, Smith AJ (1982) The Shimanto Belt of Japan: Cretaceous-lower Miocene active-margin sedimentation. In: Leggett JK (ed) Trench-forearc geology (Geological Society of London Special Publication). Geological Society of London, London, pp 5–26Google Scholar
  61. Taira A, Katto J, Tashiro M, Okamura M, Kodama K (1988) The Shimanto Belt in Shikoku, Japan: evolution of Cretaceous to Miocene accretionary prism. Mod Geol 12:5–46Google Scholar
  62. Taira A, Hill IA, Firth JV, Berner U, Brueckmann W, Bryne T, Chabernaud T, Fisher A, Foucher J, Qamo T, Gieskes JM, Hyndman RD, Karig DE, Kastner M, Kato Y, Lallemant S, Lu R, Maltman AJ, Moore GF, Moran K, Olasson G, Owens WH, Pickering KT, Siena F, Taylor E, Underwood MB, Wilkinson C, Yamano M, Zhang J (1991) Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, initial reports 131. Ocean Drilling Program, College StationGoogle Scholar
  63. Takahashi M, Saito K (1997) Miocene intra-arc bending at arc–arc collision zone, central Japan. Isl Arc 6:168–182CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Takeuchi M (1988) Alkali amphibole-bearing schist in the Sanbagawa metamorphic terrane, central Kii Peninsula. Ganko 83:69–76 (in Japanese with English abstract)Google Scholar
  65. Tobin HJ, Kinoshita M (2006) NanTroSEIZE: the IODP Nankai trough seismogenic zone experiment. Sci Drill 2:23–27CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Underwood MB, Fergusson CL (2005) Late Cenozoic evolution of the Nankai trench-slope system: evidence from sand petrography and clay mineralogy. In: Hodgson DM, Flint SS (eds) Submarine slope systems: processes and products. Geological Society London Special Publications 244. Geological Society of London, London, pp 113–129Google Scholar
  67. Underwood MB, Moore GF (1995) Trenches and trench-slope basins. In: Busby CJ, Ingersoll RV (eds) Tectonics of sedimentary basins. Blackwell Science, Cambridge, pp 179–219Google Scholar
  68. Underwood MB, Pickering KT (1996) Clay-mineral provenance, sediment dispersal patterns, and mudrock diagenesis in the Nankai accretionary prism, southwest Japan. Clays and Clay Minerals 44(3):339–356CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. von Huene R, Lallemant S (1990) Tectonic erosion along the Japan and Peru convergent margins. Geol Soc Am Bull 102(6):704–720CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Winkler HGF (1976) Petrogenesis of metamorphic rocks. Springer, Berlin, p 334CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Yamamoto Y, Kawakami S (2005) Rapid tectonics of the Late Miocene Boso accretionary prism related to the Izu-Bonin arc collision. Isl Arc 14:178–198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Yossii M (1935) On some glaucophane rocks from the Ryukyu archipelago. Science reports of the Tohoku Imperial University. 2nd series, Geology 16:225–248Google Scholar
  73. Zuffa GG (1980) Hybrid arenites: their composition and classification. J Sediment Petrol 50:21–29Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Muhammed O. Usman
    • 1
  • Hideki Masago
    • 2
  • Wilfried Winkler
    • 1
  • Michael Strasser
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Earth Sciences, Geological InstituteETH ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Center for Deep Earth ExplorationJapan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and TechnologyYokohamaJapan

Personalised recommendations