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Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 46–50 | Cite as

Progress in reducing anticipatory nausea and vomiting: a study of community practice

  • G. R. Morrow
  • Joseph A. Roscoe
  • Harry E. Hynes
  • Patrick J. Flynn
  • H. Irving Pierce
  • Thomas Burish
REVIEW ARTICLE

Abstract

 Chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting (NV) in 300 consecutive patients treated in community practices prior to the availability of 5-HT3 antiemetics (9/87 to 1/91) were compared with NV in a second sample of 300 patients treated after their commercial introduction (9/93 to 2/95). Eighty-six percent of the later patients received 5-HT3 antiemetics, and significantly fewer (43.3%) reported one or more episodes of posttreatment vomiting during their first four cycles of chemotherapy compared with those in the previous sample (55.0%: P < .01). Identical numbers of both groups (79.3%) reported at least one episode of posttreatment nausea. A significant increase in the average duration of both posttreatment nausea (from 28.1 h to 37.2 h;P = 0.001) and posttreatment vomiting (from 10.9 h–16.5 h, P = .02) was found; no significant differences were seen in the reported severity of either symptom. The proportion of patients experiencing at least one episode of anticipatory nausea (31.0% vs 32.0%) or anticipatory vomiting (7.7% vs 6.3%) did not differ significantly (P > 0.5) between groups, nor were there significant differences in the duration or severity of anticipatory symptoms (P > 0.4 for all comparisons). The reduction in the frequency of posttreatment vomiting supports research findings of efficacy. Findings of an increase in duration of posttreatment nausea and emesis and no change in the frequency of posttreatment nausea or in anticipatory symptoms show a continuing need for progress in control of posttreatment emesis and emphasize the need for further research on the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea.

Key words Nausea Vomiting Chemotherapy Anticipatory Antiemetic 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Morrow
    • 1
  • Joseph A. Roscoe
    • 1
  • Harry E. Hynes
    • 2
  • Patrick J. Flynn
    • 3
  • H. Irving Pierce
    • 4
  • Thomas Burish
    • 5
  1. 1.URCC CCOP Research Base, Behavioral Medicine Unit, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 704, Rochester, NY 14642, USA, Fax: (716)-461-5601USA
  2. 2.Wichita CCOP, 929 North St. Francis, Wichita, KS 67201-1358, USAUSA
  3. 3.Metro-Minnesota CCOP, 3800 Park Nicollet Boulevard, St. Louis Park, MN 55416-2699, USAUSA
  4. 4.Northwest CCOP, 1003 South 5th Street, 2nd Floor, Tacoma, WA 98405-4210, USAUSA
  5. 5.Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USAUSA

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