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Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 25, Issue 11, pp 3417–3423 | Cite as

Feasibility of tongue strength measurements during (chemo)radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients

  • Leen Van den SteenEmail author
  • Olivier Vanderveken
  • Jan Vanderwegen
  • Dirk Van Gestel
  • Jean-François Daisne
  • Johan Allouche
  • Laurence Delacroix
  • Diane Van Rompaey
  • Sylvie Beauvois
  • Sophie Cvilic
  • Steven Mariën
  • Gauthier Desuter
  • Jan Baptist Vermorken
  • Danielle Van den Weyngaert
  • Pol Specenier
  • Carl Van Laer
  • Marc Peeters
  • Paul Van de Heyning
  • Gilbert Chantrain
  • Georges Lawson
  • Cathy Lazarus
  • Marc De Bodt
  • Gwen Van Nuffelen
  • Member of the Belgian Cancer Plan 29_033_Dysphagia Group
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of tongue strength measures (TSMs) and the influence of bulb location, sex, and self-perceived pain and mucositis in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients during chemoradiotherapy (CRT).

Methods

Twenty-six newly diagnosed HNC patients treated with CRT performed anterior and posterior maximal isometric tongue pressures by means of the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI). The Oral Mucositis Weekly Questionnaire (OMWQ) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain during swallowing were completed weekly from baseline to 1 week post CRT.

Results

Feasibility of TSMs during CRT declines significantly from 96 to 100% at baseline to 46% after 6 weeks of CRT. But post-hoc analyses reveal only significant differences in feasibility between baseline and measurements after 4 weeks of treatment. No effect of gender or bulb location was established, but feasibility is influenced by pain and mucositis.

Conclusions

Feasibility of TSMs declines during CRT and is influenced by mucositis and pain. For the majority of subjects, TSMs were feasible within the first 4 weeks, which provides a window of scientific and clinical opportunities in this patient population.

Keywords

Head and neck cancer Dysphagia Deglutition Tongue strength Chemoradiotherapy Mucositis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was funded by Belgian Federal Cancer Plan (KPC29_033).

We thank all researchers from the KP-study group, the patients, their families, and caregivers.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Mrs. Van den Steen reports grants from Belgian Federal Cancer Plan (KPC29_033) during the conduct of the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leen Van den Steen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Olivier Vanderveken
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jan Vanderwegen
    • 4
    • 5
  • Dirk Van Gestel
    • 6
  • Jean-François Daisne
    • 7
  • Johan Allouche
    • 5
  • Laurence Delacroix
    • 8
  • Diane Van Rompaey
    • 1
  • Sylvie Beauvois
    • 6
  • Sophie Cvilic
    • 9
  • Steven Mariën
    • 1
  • Gauthier Desuter
    • 10
  • Jan Baptist Vermorken
    • 2
    • 11
    • 3
  • Danielle Van den Weyngaert
    • 12
  • Pol Specenier
    • 2
    • 11
    • 3
  • Carl Van Laer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Marc Peeters
    • 2
    • 3
    • 11
  • Paul Van de Heyning
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gilbert Chantrain
    • 5
  • Georges Lawson
    • 6
  • Cathy Lazarus
    • 13
    • 14
  • Marc De Bodt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 15
  • Gwen Van Nuffelen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 15
  • Member of the Belgian Cancer Plan 29_033_Dysphagia Group
  1. 1.Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery—Rehabilitation Center for Communication DisordersAntwerp University HospitalEdegemBelgium
  2. 2.Faculty of Medicine and Health SciencesUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  3. 3.Multi-disciplinary Oncological Center AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  4. 4.University College Thomas MoreAntwerpBelgium
  5. 5.CHU Saint-PierreBrusselsBelgium
  6. 6.Institut Jules BordetUniversité Libre de BruxellesBrusselsBelgium
  7. 7.Université Catholique de Louvain, CHU-UCL-Namur, Site Sainte-ElisabethNamurBelgium
  8. 8.Université Catholique de Louvain, CHU-UCL-Namur, Site GodinneYvoirBelgium
  9. 9.Clinique Saint-Jean BruxellesBruxellesBelgium
  10. 10.Cliniques Universitaires St-LucUniversite Catholique de LouvainBrusselsBelgium
  11. 11.Department Medical OncologyAntwerp University HospitalAntwerpBelgium
  12. 12.ZNA Multididisciplinaire OncologieAntwerpBelgium
  13. 13.Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck SurgeryMount Sinai Beth IsraelNew YorkUSA
  14. 14.Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of OtorhinolaryngologyNew YorkUSA
  15. 15.Faculty of Speech, Pathology and AudiologyGhent UniversityGhentBelgium

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