Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 13, Issue 10, pp 826–833

Efficacy of progressive muscle relaxation training and guided imagery in reducing chemotherapy side effects in patients with breast cancer and in improving their quality of life

  • Hee J. Yoo
  • Se H. Ahn
  • Sung B. Kim
  • Woo K. Kim
  • Oh S. Han
Original Article

Abstract

Goals

This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation training (PMRT) and guided imagery (GI) in reducing the anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV) and postchemotherapy nausea and vomiting (PNV) of patients with breast cancer and to measure their effects on the patients’ quality of life (QoL).

Patients and methods

Thirty chemotherapy-naive patients with breast cancer were randomized to the PMRT and GI group and 30 to the control group. Before each of six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, each patient was administered a self-report Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist (MAACL), and incidents of ANV and PNV for the first three postchemotherapy days were recorded. All patients were administered the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—Breast (FACT-B) at baseline and after 3 and 6 months.

Results

We found that the PMRT and GI group was significantly less anxious, depressive, and hostile than the control group. We also found that the PMRT and GI group experienced significantly less ANV and PNV and that 6 months after CT, the QoL of the PMRT and GI group was higher than that of the control group.

Conclusion

These results indicate that PMRT and GI were associated with both the improvements in ANV and PNV and in the QoL of patients with breast cancer.

Keywords

Breast cancer Anticipatory side effects Postchemotherapy side effects Progressive muscle relaxation Guided imagery Quality of life 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hee J. Yoo
    • 1
  • Se H. Ahn
    • 2
  • Sung B. Kim
    • 3
  • Woo K. Kim
    • 3
  • Oh S. Han
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Asan Medical CenterUniversity of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Surgery, Asan Medical CenterUniversity of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  3. 3.Department of Oncology, Asan Medical CenterUniversity of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea

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