Wiener klinische Wochenschrift

, Volume 120, Issue 19–20, pp 600–607

Differences in critical care practice between an industrialized and a developing country

  • Martin W. Dünser
  • Otgon Bataar
  • Ganbat Tsenddorj
  • Ganbold Lundeg
  • Christian Torgersen
  • Jacques-André Romand
  • Walter R. Hasibeder
Original Article

Summary

BACKGROUND: Few data are available on intensive care unit (ICU) patient populations and critical care medicine practices in developing countries. METHODS: This prospective study evaluated differences in patient characteristics, ICU practice, and outcome between the ICUs of a Mongolian 400-bed tertiary university hospital (MonICU) and an Austrian 429-bed secondary hospital (AutICU). Demographics, chronic health status, clinical parameters, disease and therapeutic severity scores, and outcome were documented for all patients admitted to the two ICUs during a period of four and a half months. Standard tests and multiple regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: A total of 203 critically ill patients were admitted to MonICU and 257 to AutICU. MonICU patients had fewer chronic diseases than AutICU patients (0.9 ± 0.8 vs. 2.7 ± 1.5, P < 0.001) but more frequently suffered from tuberculosis (2.5% vs. 0%, P = 0.01) and more frequently had never been medically examined before ICU admission (10.8% vs. 0%, P < 0.001). Admission diagnoses differed both in type and relative proportions in the two ICUs (P < 0.001). Admission of MonICU patients was more frequently unplanned (69% vs. 50.2%, P < 0.001), and although disease was more severe in these patients they received fewer therapeutic interventions than the AutICU patients. Overall mortality was higher in the MonICU patients (19.7 vs. 6.2%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patient characteristics and ICU practices varied significantly between the two ICUs. Mortality was substantially greater at MonICU, particularly among patients suffering from multiple-organ dysfunction. Strategies to improve the care of critically ill patients at MonICU should address both system- and staff-related problems, improve acceptance of the ICU service among physicians of other disciplines and upgrade the training of ICU staff.

Keywords

Intensive care medicine Less developed countries Mortality Mongolia Austria 

Unterschiede in der intensivmedizinischen Praxis zwischen einem Industrie- und einem Entwicklungsland

Zusammenfassung

HINTERGRUND: Es stehen nur wenige Daten über die Patientenpopulationen und intensivmedizinischen Behandlungspraktiken in Entwicklungsländern zur Verfügung. METHODIK: In dieser prospektiven Studie wurden Unterschiede in Patientencharakteristika, intensivmedizinischer Praxis und Outcome zwischen einer Intensivstation in einem mongolischen Universitätskrankenhaus mit 400 Betten (MonICU) und einer Intensivstation in einem österreichischen Schwerpunktkrankenhaus mit 429 Betten (AutICU) untersucht. Demographische Daten, Vorerkrankungen, klinische Parameter, Behandlungs- und Erkrankungsschweregradscores sowie die Sterblichkeit wurden bei allen Patienten, die an der MonICU bzw. AutICU aufgenommen wurden, während fünfeinhalb Monaten erfasst. Standardtests und eine multiple Regressionsanalyse wurden zur statistischen Auswertung herangezogen. ERGEBNISSE: Zweihundertdrei kritisch kranke Patienten wurden an der MonICU aufgenommen, 257 an der AutICU. MonICU Patienten wiesen weniger Vorerkrankungen als AutICU Patienten auf (0.9 ± 0.8 vs. 2.7 ± 1.5, p < 0.001), aber litten öfters an Tuberkulose (2.5 vs. 0%, p = 0.01) und waren häufiger vor ihrer Aufnahme auf die Intensivstation nie medizinisch untersucht worden (10.8 vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Die Aufnahmediagnosen unterschieden sich zwischen den beiden Intensivstationen sowohl in Art als auch relativer Häufigkeit (p < 0.001). MonICU Patienten wurden häufiger ungeplant aufgenommen (69 vs. 50.2%, p < 0.001) und waren schwerer erkrankt, erhielten aber weniger therapeutische Interventionen als AutICU Patienten. Die Gesamtsterblichkeit war in der MonICU höher als in der AutICU (19.7 vs. 6.2%, p < 0.001). ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Patientencharakteristika und intensivmedizinische Praktiken unterschieden sich signifikant zwischen den beiden Intensivstationen. Die Sterblichkeit auf der Intensivstation war bei in der MonICU behandelten Patienten deutlich höher, besonders dann wenn die Patienten an einem Multiorgandysfunktionssyndrom litten. Strategien zur Verbesserung der Behandlung von kritisch kranken Patienten in der MonICU sollten sich auf system- und personalbezogene Probleme, eine Erhöhung der Akzeptanz der Intensivmedizin bei Ärzten anderer Disziplinen sowie auf eine verbesserte Ausbildung des Personals der Intensivstation konzentrieren.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Lenz K (2007) Development of intensive care medicine in Austria – with special reference to the internal medicine intensive care unit. Wien Klin Wochenschr 119: 9–12CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Schuster HP (2007) Development of intensive care medicine in Germany – from the beginning to the present. Wien Klin Wochenschr 119: 6–9CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Dünser MW, Baelani I, Ganbold L (2006) A review and analysis of intensive care medicine in the least developed countries. Crit Care Med 34: 1234–1242CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. The Human Development Report 2007/2008. Available online at http://hdr.undp.org. Accessed December 26, 2007
  5. Bhagwanjee S (2006) Critical care in Africa. Crit Care Clin 22: 433–438CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Jochberger S, Ismailova F, Lederer W, et al (2008) Anesthesia and its allied disciplines in the developing world: A nationwide survey of the Republic of Zambia. Anesth Analg 106: 942–948CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Hodges SC, Mijumbi C, Okello M, et al (2007) Anaesthesia services in developing countries: defining the problems. Anaesthesia 62: 4–11CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. WHO Country Fact Sheet, Mongolia 2006. Available online at: www.who.int/whosis/database. Accessed December 26, 2007Google Scholar
  9. Le Gall JR, Lemeshow S, Saulnier F (1993) A new simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) based on a European/North American multicenter study. JAMA 270: 2957–2963CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Miranda DR, de Rijk A, Schaufeli W (1996) Simplified intervention scoring system: the TISS-28 items – results from a multicenter study. Crit Care Med 24: 67–73Google Scholar
  11. American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine Conference (1992) Definitions for sepsis and organ failure and guidelines for the use of innovative therapies in sepsis. Crit Care Med 20: 864–874CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Goris RJ, te Boekhorst TP, Nuytinck JK, Gimbrere JS (1985) Multiple-organ failure. Generalized autodestructive inflammation? Arch Surg 120: 1109–1115CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Ebright JR, Altantsetseg T, Oyungerel R (2003) Emerging infectious diseases in Mongolia. Emerg Infect Dis 9: 1509–1515CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  14. Frieden TR, Sterling TR, Munsiff SS, et al (2003) Tuberculosis. Lancet 362: 887–899CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Dünser MW, Baelani I, Ganbold L (2006) The specialty of anaesthesia outside Western medicine with special consideration of personal experience in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Mongolia. Anaesthesist 55: 118–132CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. McNicol L, Story DA, Leslie K, et al (2007) Postoperative complications and mortality in older patients having non-cardiac surgery at three Melbourne teaching hospitals. Med J Aust 186: 447–452PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Bracht H, Hänggi M, Jeker B, et al (2007) Incidence of low central venous oxygen saturation during unplanned admissions in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit: an observational study. Crit Care 11: R2CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  18. Haller G, Myles PS, Langley M, et al (2008) Assessment of an unplanned admission to the intensive care unit as a global safety indicator in surgical patients. Anaesth Intensive Care 36: 190–200PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Thaller F, Stickler K, Lenhart V, et al (2006) Sepsis. Wien Klin Wochenschr 118: 93–106CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Gurm HS, Bates ER (2007) Cardiogenic shock complicating myocardial infarction. Crit Care Clin 23: 759–777CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Khan JM, Goss CH, Heagerty PJ, et al (2006) Hospital volume and the outcome of mechanical ventilation. N Engl J Med 355: 41–50CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Sprung CL, Cohen SL, Sjokvist P, et al (2003) End-of-life practices in European intensive care units: the Ethicus Study. JAMA 290: 790–797CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Nouira S, Roupie E, El Atrouss S, et al (1998) Intensive care use in a developing country: a comparison between a Tunisian and a French unit. Intensive Care Med 24: 1144–1151CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin W. Dünser
    • 1
  • Otgon Bataar
    • 2
  • Ganbat Tsenddorj
    • 2
  • Ganbold Lundeg
    • 2
  • Christian Torgersen
    • 1
  • Jacques-André Romand
    • 3
  • Walter R. Hasibeder
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care MedicineInnsbruck Medical UniversityInnsbruckAustria
  2. 2.Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care MedicineCentral State University HospitalUlaanbaatarMongolia
  3. 3.Intensive Care Medicine Service, HUGGenevaSwitzerland
  4. 4.Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care MedicineKrankenhaus der Barmherzigen SchwesternRied im InnkreisAustria

Personalised recommendations