e & i Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik

, Volume 123, Issue 4, pp 124–128 | Cite as

Mobile applications that empower people to monitor their personal health

  • K. H. Connelly
  • A. M. Faber
  • Y. Rogers
  • K. A. Siek
  • T. Toscos
Originalarbeit

Researchers have an opportunity to develop assistive applications that empower people to change unhealthy habits through monitoring their behavior. Mobile applications can enhance self-monitoring by providing real-time feedback and employing persuasive technology. The projects presented demonstrate the potential of persuasive, assistive applications for both chronically ill and healthy individuals.

Keywords

Health informatics Patient-centered Assistive applications Preventative applications Mobile computing 

Mobile Computertechnologie zur Überwachung gesundheitsspezifischer Daten für Normalverbraucher

Mobile Geräte durchdringen zunehmend alle Lebensbereiche. Daher haben Forscher die Möglichkeit, assistierende Anwendungen zu entwickeln, die Normalverbrauchern erlauben, ihre gesundheitsspezifischen Daten im Alltag zu verfolgen. Traditionelle handschriftliche Methoden mit Zettel und Stift können durch mobile Geräte ersetzt werden. In diesem Artikel beschreiben die Autoren zwei Anwendungen, die sowohl Gesunde als auch Kranke unterstützen.

Schlüsselwörter

Medizinische Informatik Patientenorientiert Assistierende Anwendungen Vorbeugende Anwendungen Mobile computing 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. H. Connelly
    • 1
  • A. M. Faber
    • 1
  • Y. Rogers
    • 1
  • K. A. Siek
    • 1
  • T. Toscos
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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