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International Journal of Biometeorology

, Volume 56, Issue 6, pp 1167–1171 | Cite as

Exploratory study on the influence of climatological parameters on Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection dynamics

  • Joaquim Segalés
  • Oliver Valero
  • Anna Espinal
  • Sergio López-Soria
  • Miquel Nofrarías
  • Maria Calsamiglia
  • Marina SibilaEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

The objective of the present work was to elucidate the potential relationship between Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection and seroconversion dynamics and climatological conditions in four groups of pigs from the same farm born in different seasons of the year. Nasal swabs and blood samples were taken from 184 pigs at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 22 and 25 (slaughter age) weeks of age. Outside climatologic parameters, including temperature (°C), relative humidity (%), precipitation (l/m2) and wind speed (m/s) were recorded weekly from January 2003 to June 2004. Percentage of nPCR detection of M. hyopneumoniae in nasal swabs was associated significantly with the weekly precipitation rate [P = 0.0018, OR = 1.31 (IC = 1.11–1.55)]; the higher the precipitation rate, the higher the probability of being M. hyopneumoniae nPCR-positive. On the other hand, the percentage of seropositive pigs had a significant association with mean weekly temperature rate [P = 0.0012, OR = 0.89 [IC = 0.84–0.95]); the lower the temperature, the higher the probability of being M. hyopneumoniae seropositive. Animals born in autumn (when higher precipitations rates were recorded), entering finishing units in winter (when lower temperatures were recorded), and reaching slaughter in spring, had the highest probability of being infected by M. hyopneumoniae and the highest probability of being M. hyopneumoniae seropositive.

Keywords

Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae nPCR ELISA Climatologic parameters 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Mrs. Mónica Pérez, Merche Mora and Eva Huerta (Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal, CReSA), and Jaime Maldonado (Hipra) for technical assistance.

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Copyright information

© ISB 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joaquim Segalés
    • 1
    • 2
  • Oliver Valero
    • 3
  • Anna Espinal
    • 3
  • Sergio López-Soria
    • 1
  • Miquel Nofrarías
    • 1
  • Maria Calsamiglia
    • 1
  • Marina Sibila
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA), UAB-IRTACampus de la Universitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterraSpain
  2. 2.Departament de Sanitat i Anatomia AnimalsUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterraSpain
  3. 3.Servei d’EstadísticaUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterraSpain

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