International Journal of Biometeorology

, Volume 52, Issue 7, pp 553–561 | Cite as

Atmospheric pressure fluctuations in the far infrasound range and emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases

  • L. A. Didyk
  • Yu. P. Gorgo
  • J. J. J. Dirckx
  • V. B. Bogdanov
  • J. A. N. Buytaert
  • V. A. Lysenko
  • N. P. Didyk
  • A. V. Vershygora
  • V. T. Erygina
Review

Abstract

This study examines whether a relation exists between rapid atmospheric pressure fluctuations, attributed to the far infrasound frequency range (APF), and a number of emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases (EEC). Over an entire year, the average integral amplitudes of APF in the range of periods from 3 s to 120 s over each hour (HA) were measured. Daily dynamics of HA averaged over the year revealed a wave shape with smooth increase from night to day followed by decrease from day to night. The total daily number of EEC within the city of Kiev, Ukraine, was related to the daily mean of HA (DHA) and to the ratio of HA averaged over the day time to HA averaged over the night time (Rdn), and was checked for confounding effects of classical meteorological variables through non-parametric regression algorithms. The number of EEC were significantly higher on days with high DHA (3.72–11.07 Pa, n = 87) compared to the low DHA (0.7–3.62 Pa, n = 260, p = 0.01), as well at days with low Rdn (0.21–1.64, n = 229) compared to the high Rdn (1.65–7.2, n = 118, p = 0.03). A difference between DHA and Rdn effects on the emergency events related to different categories of circulatory diseases points to a higher sensitivity of rheumatic and cerebro-vascular diseases to DHA, and ischaemic and hypertensive diseases to Rdn. Results suggest that APF could be considered as a meteorotropic factor capable of influencing circulatory system diseases.

Keywords

Atmospheric pressure fluctuations Far infrasound frequency range Meteorological variables Emergency events Circulatory system diseases 

References

  1. Bedard AJ, Georges TM (2000) Atmospheric infrasound. Phys Today 3:32–37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cooke LJ, Rose MS, Becker WJ (2000) Chinook winds and migraine headache. Neurology 54:302–307PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Danet S, Richard F, Montaye M, Beauchant S, Lemaire B, Graux C, Cottel D, Marecaux N, Amouyel P (1999) Unhealthy effects of atmospheric temperature and pressure on the occurrence of myocardial infarction and coronary deaths. Circulation 100:e1–e7PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Delyukov A, Didyk L (1999) The effects of extra-low-frequency atmospheric pressure oscillations on human mental activity. Int J Biometeorol 43:31–37PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Didyk LA, Bogdanov VB, Lysenko VA, Didyk NP, Gorgo YP, Dirckx JJJ (2007) The effects of slight pressure oscillations in the far infrasound frequency range on the pars flaccida in gerbil and rabbit ears. Int J Biometeorol 51:221–231PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Dirckx JJJ, Decraemer WF, von Unge M, Larsson CH (1998) Volume displacement of the gerbil eardrum pars flaccida as a function of middle ear pressure. Hear Res 118:35–46PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Feijen RA, Segenhout JM, Albers WJ, Wit HP (2002) Changes of guinea pig inner ear pressure by square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation. Acta Otolaryngol 122:138–145PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gossard EE, Hooke WH (1975) Waves in the atmosphere: atmospheric infrasound and gravity waves – their generation and propagation. Elsevier, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  9. Green JE, Dunn F (1968) Correlation of naturally occurring infrasonics and selected human behaviour. J Acoustic Soc 44:1456–1457CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Guo Y-F, Stein PK (2003) Circadian rhythm in the cardiovascular system: chronocardiology. Am Heart J 145:779–786PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Halberg F, Reinhart J, Bartter F, Delea C, Gordon R, Wolff S, Reinberg A, Ghata J, Hofmann H, Halhuber M, Gunther R, Knapp E, Pena JC, Garcia SM (1969) Agreement in endpoins from circadian rhythmometry on healthy human being living on different continents. Experientia 25:106–112CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Humphreys WJ (1929) Physics of the air. McGraw-Hill, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  13. Kompanets VS (1968) Effects of repeated opposite directional changes in the barometric pressure on man. Voenno-medicinsky zhurnal 6:61–63 (in Russian)Google Scholar
  14. Lumley JI, Panofsky HA (1964) The structure of atmospheric turbulence. Interscience, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  15. Majidov NM, Sidiki MU, Kilichev IA, Halimova ZY, Gnedykx ON (1991) The effects of meteorological factors on the death rate from brain strokes in the flat countries of the Middle Asia. Zn Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im SS Korsakova 91(11):48–49 (in Russian)Google Scholar
  16. McNamee R (2005) Regression modelling and other methods to control confounding. Occup Environ Med 62:500–506PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Mezernitsky PG (1934) Medical meteorology. Brief handbook. GIMK, Yalta-Crimea (in Russian)Google Scholar
  18. Naito Y, Ito J, Tsuji J, Honjo I (1988) The influence of middle ear pressure on the otolith system in cats. Arch Otorhinolaryngol 245:321–324PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Richner H, Graber W (1978) The ability of non-classical meteorological parameters to penetrate into buildings. Int J Biometeorol 22:242–248CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Rockley TJ, Hawke WM (1992) The middle ear as a baroreceptor. Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) 112:816–823CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Smolensky MH, Tatar SE, Bergman SA, Losman JG, Barnard CN, Dasco CC, Kraft IA (1976) Circadian rhythmic aspects of human cardiovascular function: a review by chronobiologic statistical methods. Chronobiologia 3:337–371PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Storlie CB, Helton JC (2005) Multiple predictor smoothing methods for sensitivity analysis. In: Kuhl ME, Steiger NM, Armstrong FB, Joines JA (eds) Proceedings of the 37th 2005 Winter Simulation Conference, Orlando, Fla., USA, pp 231–239Google Scholar
  23. Temnikova NS (1977) The influence of atmospheric pressure on cardiovascular diseases. Gidrometeoizdat, Leningrad (in Russian)Google Scholar
  24. Troshin VD, Suchkina EG (1986) Effects of meteoro-heliofactors on psycho-physiological reactions in healthy subjects and patients suffering from brain vascular damage. Zn Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im SS Korsakova 86:1320–1323 (in Russian)Google Scholar
  25. Vladymirsky BM (1982) The atmospheric infrasound as a possible physical agent transferring solar activity influence to the biosphere. Probl Kosm Biol 43:174–179 (in Russian)Google Scholar
  26. Voronin NM (1981) The basis of medical and biological climatology. Medicina, Moscow (in Russian)Google Scholar
  27. Yates BJ, Goto T, Bolton PS (1993) Responses of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the cat to natural vestibular stimulation. Brain Research 601(1–2):255–264PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© ISB 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. A. Didyk
    • 1
  • Yu. P. Gorgo
    • 2
  • J. J. J. Dirckx
    • 3
  • V. B. Bogdanov
    • 2
  • J. A. N. Buytaert
    • 3
  • V. A. Lysenko
    • 2
  • N. P. Didyk
    • 1
  • A. V. Vershygora
    • 4
  • V. T. Erygina
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of PhysicsNational Academy of Sciences of UkraineKievUkraine
  2. 2.Biological DepartmentTaras Shevchenko National UniversityKievUkraine
  3. 3.Laboratory of Biomedical PhysicsUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  4. 4.Kiev Station of Emergency Services and Medicine of CatastrophesKievUkraine

Personalised recommendations