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Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 13, Issue 8, pp 662–667 | Cite as

Clinical behavioral problems in day- and night-wetting children

  • A. von Gontard
  • Klaus Mauer-Mucke
  • Julia Plück
  • Walter Berner
  • Gerd Lehmkuhl
Original Article

Abstract 

In this prospective, clinical study of 167 consecutive wetting children, the associations between specific forms of day and night wetting and clinical behavioral symptoms according to a parental questionnaire (Child Behavior Checklist; CBCL), as well as ICD-10 child psychiatric diagnoses are analyzed. For the entire group, the proportion of children with at least one ICD-10 diagnosis was 40.1% and for the CBCL total problems scale 28.2% – three times higher than in the general population. Expansive disorders (21%) were twice as common as emotional disorders (12%). A significantly higher (P<0.05) proportion of day-wetting children had at least one diagnosis (52.6%) and emotional disorders (19.5%) compared with nocturnal enuretics (33.6% and 8.2%, respectively). Secondary nocturnal enuretics had significantly higher CBCL total problem scores (39.3% vs. 20.0%, P<0.05) as well as psychiatric ICD-10 diagnoses (75% vs. 19.5%, P<0.001) than primary enuretics. Children with primary monosymptomatic enuresis had the lowest rate of CBCL total behavioral symptoms (14.5%) and diagnoses (10%). Of the day-wetting children, those with voiding postponement had more expansive disorders (39.3% vs. 13.6%, P<0.05) and externalizing symptoms (37% vs. 19.%, NS) than those with urge incontinence. In summary, a third of wetting children showed clinically relevant behavioral problems with specific psychiatric comorbidity for the subtypes. A more-detailed differentiation into syndromes rather than into day/night and primary/secondary forms is needed.

Key words Nocturnal enuresis Day wetting Primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis Urge incontinence Voiding postponement Child Behavior Checklist ICD-10 child psychiatic disorders 

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Copyright information

© IPNA - International Pediatric Nephrology Association New York, USA 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. von Gontard
    • 1
  • Klaus Mauer-Mucke
    • 1
  • Julia Plück
    • 1
  • Walter Berner
    • 1
  • Gerd Lehmkuhl
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cologne, Robert-Koch Strasse 10, D-50931 Cologne, Germany, Tel.: +49-221-478-5337, Fax: +49-221-478-6104DE

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