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Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 435–437 | Cite as

Increased recognition of IgA nephropathy in African-American children

  • Azra M. Sehic
  • Lillian W. Gaber
  • Shane Roy III
  • Paula M. Miller
  • Stephen B. Kritchevsky
  • Robert J. Wyatt
Original article

Abstract.

Based upon the percentage of cases of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) in biopsy series, a lower prevalence has been assumed for African-Americans compared with Americans of European descent. This may be due to a racial difference in the basic underlying pathology of IgAN or to racial differences in patterns of referral and biopsy selection practices. Over the past decade (1985 – 1994), we have found similar incidences of IgAN in Caucasian and African-American children from Shelby County, Tennessee. The incidence was 3.0 cases per million per year for Caucasian and 5.7 cases per million per year for African-American children. IgAN may be more common in African-American children than previously appreciated. Population-based incidence studies will be necessary to determine whether or not our experience has become a more widespread phenomenon.

Key words: IgA nephropathy Incidence African-American children 

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Copyright information

© IPNA - International Pediatric Nephrology Association New York, USA 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Azra M. Sehic
    • 1
  • Lillian W. Gaber
    • 2
  • Shane Roy III
    • 1
  • Paula M. Miller
    • 1
  • Stephen B. Kritchevsky
    • 3
  • Robert J. Wyatt
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, and the Crippled Children’s Foundation Research Center at the Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USAUS
  2. 2.Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, and the Crippled Children’s Foundation Research Center at the Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USAUS
  3. 3.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee, Memphis, and the Crippled Children’s Foundation Research Center at the Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USAUS

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