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Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 31, Issue 6, pp 1035–1037 | Cite as

Erratum to: Health-related quality of life and mental health in parents of children with hemolytic uremic syndrome

  • Kathrin Buder
  • Helene Werner
  • Markus A. Landolt
  • Thomas J. Neuhaus
  • Guido F. Laube
  • Giuseppina Spartà
Erratum
  • 611 Downloads

Erratum to: Pediatr Nephrol

DOI 10.1007/s00467-015-3294-0

In the legends of Table 2 (footnote c), Table 4 (footnote c), and Table 5 (footnote b), the term “Cronbach’s α” was wrongly mentioned. Instead, the indicated values refer to the effect size according to Cohen’s d. Also, in all three of these tables a large effect is indicated by a Cohen’s d > 0.80 rather than > 80.

In the legends of Table 2 and 4 (footnotes d and e in each case), the term “vs.” was mistakenly used instead of the correct “minus”.

In Table 4, the wrong superscript - indicating which statistical test was applied – was used in two places. Comparison of maternal and paternal mental health scores with normative data was tested by using one-sample t tests; the comparison of mothers’ and fathers’ mental health scores was tested by using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests.

The correct versions of Tables 2, 4 and 5 are shown here.
Table 2

Health-related quality of life of mothers and fathers with HUS-affected children, compared with population norm and between mothers and fathers

SF-36 scales

Mothers (n = 61–63)

Comparison of mothers’ HRQoL with female references (normative data)a

Fathers (n = 58)

Comparison of fathers’ HRQoL with male references (normative data)a

Comparison of mothers’ and fathers’ HRQoLb (n = 56–58)

p

d c, d

p

d c,d

p

d c, e

Physical functions

94.4 ± 16.5

0.02

0.30

96.2 ± 8.0

<0.001

0.44

0.88

−0.14

Role physical

91.1 ± 20.9

0.01

0.27

97.4 ± 10.1

<0.001

0.46

0.04

−0.38

Bodily pain

83.8 ± 22.0

<0.001

0.77

90.0 ± 16.6

<0.001

0.88

0.09

−0.32

General health

80.8 ± 16.1

<0.001

0.69

77.6 ± 16.1

<0.001

0.59

0.30

0.20

Vitality

65.7 ± 17.1

<0.001

0.48

67.1 ± 17.2

0.20

0.17

0.73

−0.08

Social functions

89.3 ± 18.5

0.05

0.24

90.7 ± 15.6

0.46

0.09

0.49

−0.08

Role emotional

94.5 ± 20.4

<0.01

0.30

96.0 ± 15.4

0.05

0.20

0.52

−0.08

Mental health

77.4 ± 14.9

<0.001

0.47

76.7 ± 15.9

0.48

0.10

0.82

0.04

PCS

54.3 ± 7.6

<0.001

0.70

55.4 ± 4.7

<0.001

0.81

0.70

−0.18

MCS

52.1 ± 8.8

<0.01

0.34

51.6 ± 8.2

0.85

−0.02

0.78

0.06

Data on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are presented as the mean ± SD. The higher the value, the better the HRQoL

SF-36, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 item questionnaire; PCS physical component summary score of SF-36; MCS, mental component summary score of SF-36

aValues are presented as the mean ± SD. One-sample t tests were performed

bWilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed

c d = Effect size according to Cohen [38], with a Cohen’s d value of 0.20 indicating a small effect; a d value of 0.50 indicating amedium-sized effect; a d value of < 0.80 indicating a large effect)

dDifferences: Study sample minus normative data (positive d indicates better HRQoL for the study sample compared to the population norm)

eDifferences: Mothers’ minus fathers’ data (positive d indicates better HRQoL for the mothers than for the fathers)

Table 4

Mental health of mothers and fathers with HUS-affected children, compared with population norm and between mothers and fathers

Brief Symptom Inventory scales

Mothers (n = 63)

Comparison of mothers’ mental health scores with normative dataa

Fathers (n = 58)

Comparison of fathers’ mental health scores with normative dataa

Comparison of mothers’ and fathers’ mental health scoresb

p

d c, d

p

d c, d

p

d c, e

Somatization

47.8 ± 8.9

0.05

−0.23

48.0 ± 9.3

0.10

−0.21

0.79

−0.02

Obsessive-compulsive

46.6 ± 10.4

0.01

−0.33

46.9 ± 10.4

0.03

−0.30

0.37

−0.03

Interpersonal sensitivity

46.7 ± 10.8

0.02

−0.32

47.6 ± 8.5

0.04

−0.26

0.43

−0.09

Depression

46.6 ± 9.7

<0.01

−0.35

49.3 ± 8.9

0.53

−0.08

0.01

−0.29

Anxiety

47.4 ± 10.0

0.05

−0.26

47.3 ± 9.8

0.04

−0.27

0.68

0.02

Hostility

49.3 ± 10.7

0.58

−0.07

49.5 ± 9.5

0.70

−0.05

0.87

−0.03

Phobic anxiety

47.4 ± 7.4

<0.01

−0.30

48.4 ± 7.4

0.11

−0.18

<0.001

−0.14

Paranoid ideation

48.1 ± 9.4

0.12

−0.19

50.5 ± 9.9

0.71

0.05

0.06

−0.24

Psychoticism

50.8 ± 10.2

0.55

0.08

48.2 ± 7.8

0.08

−0.20

0.50

0.29

Global Severity Index

45.0 ± 13.2

<0.01

−0.43

45.0 ± 13.5

<0.01

−0.42

0.96

−0.01

Data on the mental health of the parents are presented as the mean ± SD. The higher the value, the lower the mental health score

aOne-sample t tests were performed

bWilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed

c d = Effect size according to Cohen [38], with a Cohen’s d value of 0.20 indicating a small effect; a d value of 0.50 indicating a medium-sized effect; a d value of < 0.80 indicating a large effect)

dDifferences: study sample minus normative data (negative d indicates better mental health for the study sample compared to the population norm)

eDifferences: Mothers’ minus fathers’ data (negative d indicates better mental health for the mothers than for the fathers)

Table 5

Prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to DSM-IV in 63 mothers and 58 fathers experiencing their child’s hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) as a traumatic event

Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale items

Mothers

Fathers

Comparison between mothers and fathersa

p

d b

Parents stating their child’s HUS as a traumatic event

24 (38 %)

20 (35 %)

  

Intrusion

 DSM-IV criterion met

20 (32 %)

10 (17 %)

  

 Number of symptoms

2.1 ± 1.5 [0–5]

1.2 ± 1.4 [0–4]

0.02

0.65

Avoidance

 DSM-IV criterion met

1 (2 %)

2 (4)

  

 Number of symptoms

0.9 ± 1.4 [0–6]

0.6 ± 1.3 [0–5]

0.02

0.24

Hyperarousal

 DSM-IV criterion met

7 (11 %)

6 (10 %)

  

 Number of symptoms

1.1 ± 1.5 [0–5]

0.9 ± 1.2 [0–3]

0.11

0.17

All 3 symptom clusters

 DSM-IV criteria for full PTSD met

0 (0 %)

2 (4)

  

 Criteria for partial PTSD met

4 (6 %)

1 (2)

  

 Total symptom severity

6.1 ± 6.7 [1–30]

3.1 ± 4.0 [0–15]

<0.01

0.54

Data are presented as the mean ± SD with the range given in square brackets, or as a number with the percentage in parenthesis

PTSD, Post-traumatic stress disorder; DSM-IV, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (version IV)

aWilcoxon signed-rank tests for continuous variables were performed

b d = Effect size according to Cohen [38],with a Cohen’s d value of 0.20 indicating a small effect; a d value of 0.50 indicating a medium-sized effect; a d value of < 0.80 indicating a large effect). Mothers’ vs. fathers’ data, with a positive d indicating a higher number of PTSD symptoms for the mothers than for the fathers

Copyright information

© IPNA 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathrin Buder
    • 1
  • Helene Werner
    • 2
  • Markus A. Landolt
    • 2
    • 3
  • Thomas J. Neuhaus
    • 4
  • Guido F. Laube
    • 1
  • Giuseppina Spartà
    • 1
  1. 1.Pediatric Nephrology UnitUniversity Children’s Hospital ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of Psychosomatics and PsychiatryUniversity Children’s Hospital ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  3. 3.Department of Child and Adolescent Health Psychology, Institute of PsychologyUniversity of ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  4. 4.Children’s Hospital of LucerneCantonal Hospital of LucerneLucerne 16Switzerland

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