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Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 22, Issue 11, pp 1963–1965 | Cite as

Intravenous iron treatment in paediatric chronic kidney disease patients not on erythropoietin

  • Henry E. G. MorganEmail author
  • Richard C. L. Holt
  • Caroline A. Jones
  • Brian A. Judd
Brief Report

Abstract

Intravenous (IV) iron treatment reduces erythropoietin (EPO) dose in paediatric haemodialysis patients. The efficacy in paediatric nonhaemodialysis patients is less well established. IV iron is routinely given in our institution to these patients, including some who have not started EPO. The effect of this strategy was examined. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) not on EPO were identified. Case notes were reviewed for haemoglobin (Hb), red cell and iron indices for 6 months before and at least 3 months after IV iron. Five patients were identified. Mean age was 13.3 years and mean IV iron (Venofer) dose = 3.1 mg/kg. Median number of doses = 7 (range 3–10). Hb increased significantly after IV iron from 11.4 ± 0.7 to 12.8 ± 1.3 g/dl (p = 0.02). Mean cell volume increased from 87.7±3.4 to 90.1 ± 3.7 fl (p = 0.01), and mean cell Hb remained unchanged: 29.2 ± 1.2 to 29.7 ± 1.0 pg (p = 0.12). Absolute and percentage reticulocyte count remained unchanged. There was no change in iron indices: ferritin 55.1 ± 31.3 to 97.3 ± 46.5 ng/ml (p = 0.3), iron 18.9 ± 6.9 to 18.1 ± 4.2 μmol/l (p = 0.7), transferrin 1.9 ± 1.6 to 2.0 ± 0.1 g/l (p = 1.0), transferrin saturation 35.7 ± 8.1 to 40.3 ± 18.0% (p = 0.5). IV iron slightly improved Hb levels in five paediatric CKD and PD patients not receiving EPO. This strategy may delay the need for EPO treatment and deserves further evaluation.

Keywords

Intravenous iron Chronic kidney disease Peritoneal dialysis Haemoglobin Erythropoietin 

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Copyright information

© IPNA 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry E. G. Morgan
    • 1
    Email author
  • Richard C. L. Holt
    • 1
  • Caroline A. Jones
    • 1
  • Brian A. Judd
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Paediatric NephrologyRoyal Liverpool Children’s HospitalLiverpoolUK

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