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Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 20, Issue 8, pp 1126–1130 | Cite as

Hematuria and proteinuria in a mass school urine screening test

  • Yong-Hoon Park
  • Jung-Youn Choi
  • Hyo-Seok Chung
  • Ja-Wook Koo
  • Su-Yung Kim
  • Mee-Kyung Namgoong
  • Young-Seo Park
  • Kee-Hwan Yoo
  • Kyung-Yil Lee
  • Dae-Yeol Lee
  • Seung-Joo Lee
  • Ji-Eun Lee
  • Woo-Yeong Chung
  • Tae-Sun Hah
  • Hae-IL Cheong
  • Yong Choi
  • Kyung-Soo Lee
Original Article

Abstract

A total of 1,044 school children identified with hematuria and/or proteinuria during a mass school urine screening test were referred to pediatric nephrologists at 13 hospitals in Korea. These children had isolated hematuria (IH) (60.1%), isolated proteinuria (IP) (26.4%: transient, 19.6%; orthostatic, 4.9%; persistent, 1.9%) or combined hematuria and proteinuria (CHP) (13.5%). The patient’s history, physical examination, laboratory tests, kidney ultrasound and Doppler ultrasonography were obtained. Renal biopsies were performed on 113 children who showed severe proteinuria, hypertension, abnormal renal function, family history of chronic renal disease, systemic diseases or persistent hematuria and/or proteinuria for more than 12 months. IgA nephropathy (IgAN), thin basement membrane nephropathy (TBMN), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), other GN, Alport syndrome and lupus nephritis were detected. IgAN and TBMN were the most common causes in the CHP group and IH group, respectively. Abnormal findings on the renal ultrasound with or without Doppler ultrasonography were noted in 147 cases (suspected nutcracker phenomenon, 65; increased parenchymal echogenicity, 40; hydronephrosis, 15). This study showed that the use of a mass school urine screening program can detect chronic renal disease in its early stage and recommends that more attention should be paid to identifying those children with CHP and massive proteinuria. A school urine screening program can detect chronic renal disease in its early stage. When mass screening is used, the initial aggressive diagnostic procedures such as renal biopsy are not needed. In addition, a regular follow-up for those children with IH and IP is certainly warranted.

Keywords

Hematuria Proteinuria School urine mass screening Chronic renal disease 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was a collaboration supported by a grant from the Korean Society of Pediatric Nephrology.

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Copyright information

© IPNA 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong-Hoon Park
    • 1
  • Jung-Youn Choi
    • 1
  • Hyo-Seok Chung
    • 1
  • Ja-Wook Koo
    • 2
  • Su-Yung Kim
    • 3
  • Mee-Kyung Namgoong
    • 4
  • Young-Seo Park
    • 5
  • Kee-Hwan Yoo
    • 6
  • Kyung-Yil Lee
    • 7
  • Dae-Yeol Lee
    • 8
  • Seung-Joo Lee
    • 9
  • Ji-Eun Lee
    • 10
  • Woo-Yeong Chung
    • 2
  • Tae-Sun Hah
    • 11
  • Hae-IL Cheong
    • 12
  • Yong Choi
    • 12
  • Kyung-Soo Lee
    • 13
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsYeungnam University College of MedicineDaeguKorea
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsInje University College of MedicinePusanKorea
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsPusan National University College of MedicinePusanKorea
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsYonsei University Wonju College of MedicineWonjuKorea
  5. 5.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  6. 6.Department of PediatricsKorea University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  7. 7.Department of PediatricsThe Catholic University of Korea College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  8. 8.Department of PediatricsChonbuk National University Medical SchoolJeonjuKorea
  9. 9.Department of PediatricsEwha Women’s University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  10. 10.Department of PediatricsInha University College of MedicineIncheonKorea
  11. 11.Department of PediatricsChungbuk National University College of MedicineCheongjuKorea
  12. 12.Department of PediatricsSeoul National University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  13. 13.Department of Preventive MedicineYeungnam University, Daegu College of MedicineDaehuKorea

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