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Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 17, Issue 8, pp 625–627 | Cite as

Acute renal failure following massive attack by Africanized bee stings

  • Nilzete L. Bresolin
  • Francisca C. Carvalho
  • José C. Goes
  • Vera Fernandes
  • Adriana M. Barotto
Clinical Nephrology

Abstract.

Bee venom is a complex substance, which acts in several tissues. Although severe allergic reactions have occurred after one or more stings, several deaths have been reported without allergic manifestations, emphasizing the toxic effects of massive poisoning. A number of about 500 stings have been considered necessary to cause death by direct toxicity, but as few as 30–50 stings have proved fatal in children. Among the major toxic effects are hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure (ARF), and shock. ARF may be due to a common toxic-ischemic mechanism with hypovolemic or anaphylactic shock, pigment tubulopathy (myoglobinuria and hemoglobinuria), or acute tubular necrosis (ATN) from a direct kidney toxicity of the venom. We present a case of rhabdomyolysis and hemolysis with consequent ARF which developed after about 800 bee stings. The patient recovered completely after peritoneal dialysis.

Acute renal failure Bee sting Child Rhabdomyolysis Hemolysis 

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Copyright information

© IPNA 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nilzete L. Bresolin
    • 1
  • Francisca C. Carvalho
    • 1
  • José C. Goes
    • 1
  • Vera Fernandes
    • 1
  • Adriana M. Barotto
    • 2
  1. 1.Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital, Rui Barbosa, 154 Agronômica, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, 88025-301Brazil
  2. 2.Toxicology Information Center, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa CatarinaBrazil

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