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Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 12, Issue 6, pp 825–827 | Cite as

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Risk of missed pathology of other organs
  • I.  Gál
  • J.  Szívós
  • M. T.  Jaberansari
  • Z.  Szabó

Abstract

Background: The wide acceptance of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has resulted in increased rates of cholecystectomy. However, the increased rate of LC bears the possibility of concomitantly missing other intra-abdominal pathologic states that exist concurrently with this procedure. The purpose of this report was to evaluate data on LC with regard to missed pathologies of other organs in a clinical prospective follow-up.

Methods: The clinical prospective follow-up of 676 patients treated laparoscopically for gallstone disease at our unit since January 1993, was studied. Converted procedures were excluded from the follow-up study.

Results: Among 676 patients who underwent LC, 4 patients (0.6%) required readmission for missed pathology of another organ. The diagnostic delay ranged from 2 weeks to 7 months. The readmissions were due to colonic cancer (2 cases), carcinoma of the stomach (1 case), and fibrosis of the mesenterium of small bowel causing ileus (1 case), which are demonstrated in detail. According to retrospective analysis of the symptoms, none of the patients had typical biliary pain at the time of laparoscopic procedure.

Conclusions: The demand for LC from patients and practitioners is becoming increasingly more frequent, as all become aware of its benefits. However, on the basis of data from the literature and this study, the authors would like to emphasize the need for careful history-taking, thorough investigation, and comparison with gallstone symptoms before LC is performed. It is emphasized, however, that surgeons using laparoscopic approaches should learn techniques of full diagnostic laparoscopy, which should be performed at the beginning of every procedure.

Key words: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy — Missed intra-abdominal pathology — Malignant tumors 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • I.  Gál
    • 1
  • J.  Szívós
    • 1
  • M. T.  Jaberansari
    • 2
  • Z.  Szabó
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Bugát Pál Hospital, Dózsa Gy. u. 20-22, H-3201 Gyöngyös, HungaryHU
  2. 2.Department of Experimental Surgery, University Medical School of Pécs, H-7624 Pécs, HungaryHU
  3. 3.Microsurgery and Operative Endoscopy Training Institute, 153 States Street, San Francisco, CA 94114, USAUS

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