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Risk factors for the recurrence of stones after endoscopic minimally invasive cholecystolithotomy in China: a meta-analysis

  • Wenchao Li
  • Pinzhu Huang
  • Purun Lei
  • Hui Luo
  • Zhicheng Yao
  • Zhiyong Xiong
  • Bo Liu
  • Kunpeng HuEmail author
Article
  • 19 Downloads

Abstract

Background

The recurrence of stones after endoscopic minimally invasive cholecystolithotomy (EMIC) remains a hazardous problem in patients with cholelithasis. We sought to evaluate the risk factors for recurrence after cholecystolithotomy and to provide a theoretical basis for the indication for cholecystolithotomy.

Methods

We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, WanFang Data, CNKI and VIP Data to identify controlled trials related to cholelithasis that were published between 2007 and 2016. The odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Stata12.0 was used to test the heterogeneity and publication bias.

Results

Eight studies involving 1663 participants were selected. No significant differences were observed in hazardous factors including advanced age, gender and diabetes mellitus compared with the control groups. However, family history of cholelithasis, multiple calculi, gallbladder wall thickening (GBWT) over 3 mm, a preference for greasy food, dysfunction of the gallbladder and not taking oral ursodeoxycholic acid post-EMIC yielded pooled ORs (95% CI) of 3.28 (2.30, 4.66), 4.24 (2.76, 6.50), 18.4 (7.23, 46.83), 1.90 (1.20, 3.01), 26.16 (10.15, 62.34) and 2.90 (1.36, 6.15), respectively.

Conclusions

A family history of cholelithasis, multiple calculi, a GBWT ≥ 3 mm, a preference for greasy food, dysfunction of the gallbladder and not taking oral ursodeoxycholic acid post-EMIC are hazardous factors for stones and sludge after cholecystolithotomy.

Keywords

Cholelithasis Gallbladder preserved Stones recurrence Risk factors EMIC 

Notes

Funding

National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 81702375. Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, No. 2016A030313200. Science and Technology Project of Guangzhou City, No. 201607010022. Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, No. 2017A030313580. Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Sun Yat-sen University), No. 17ykp.

Compliance with ethical standards

Disclosures

Drs. Wenchao Li, Pinzhu Huang, Zhicheng Yao, Purun Lei, Hui Luo, Zhiyong Xiong, Bo Liu and Kunpeng Hu have no conflicts of interest or financial ties to disclose.

Supplementary material

464_2018_6455_MOESM1_ESM.docx (17 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 16 KB)
464_2018_6455_MOESM2_ESM.docx (13 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 13 KB)
464_2018_6455_MOESM3_ESM.docx (13 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (DOCX 13 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wenchao Li
    • 1
  • Pinzhu Huang
    • 2
  • Purun Lei
    • 2
  • Hui Luo
    • 3
  • Zhicheng Yao
    • 1
  • Zhiyong Xiong
    • 1
  • Bo Liu
    • 1
  • Kunpeng Hu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of General Surgery, The Third Affiliated HospitalSun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Sixth Affiliated HospitalSun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina
  3. 3.Department of Operating Room, The Third Affiliated HospitalSun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina

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