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Construct validity of nine new inanimate exercises for robotic surgeon training using a standardized setup

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Abstract

Background

As more surgeons choose to complete procedures robotically, validated training tools are needed so that they can acquire and maintain the technical skills required to proficiently use robotic systems. The purpose of this study was to show construct validity of nine new inanimate training exercises for robot-assisted surgery. The inanimate training exercises were designed to span several core technical skills required to use a robotic system.

Methods

New (n = 30) and experienced (n = 11) robotic surgeons participated in the study. New robotic surgeons had not yet completed their first robotic surgery case and participated in this study before attending their robotic certification course. Experienced robotic surgeons had completed more than 200 robotic surgery cases. The raw scores from the exercises were reported so that other research groups could easily define custom proficiency levels. Example normalized scores that could be used in proficiency-based curricula were computed. These normalized scores balanced efficiency (completion time) and accuracy (exercise-specific errors) to measure performance. Finally, the setup was standardized using a custom docking model, which enabled consistent and repeatable completion of the inanimate exercises across surgeons.

Results

For all nine exercises, experienced robotic surgeons completed the exercises significantly faster than new robotic surgeons (p < 0.01). Similarly, experienced robotic surgeons achieved higher normalized scores than new robotic surgeons for all nine exercises (p < 0.01). Finally, consistent robot setup was achieved using the custom docking model based on an analysis of the robot kinematic data.

Conclusions

In summary, all nine inanimate exercises showed construct validity. The results suggest that the inanimate exercises along with the custom docking model can be used as part of proficiency-based curricula to improve robotic surgeon training.

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Disclosures

A. M. Jarc is a researcher in the Medical Research group at Intuitive Surgical Inc. M. Curet is the chief medical adviser at Intuitive Surgical Inc.

Author information

Correspondence to Anthony M. Jarc.

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Supplementary material 8 (MP4 14154 kb)

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Supplementary material 1 (MP4 6684 kb)

Supplementary material 2 (MP4 6946 kb)

Supplementary material 3 (MP4 7356 kb)

Supplementary material 4 (MP4 15107 kb)

Supplementary material 5 (MP4 7843 kb)

Supplementary material 6 (MP4 20602 kb)

Supplementary material 7 (MP4 6391 kb)

Supplementary material 8 (MP4 14154 kb)

Supplementary material 9 (MP4 18056 kb)

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Jarc, A.M., Curet, M. Construct validity of nine new inanimate exercises for robotic surgeon training using a standardized setup. Surg Endosc 28, 648–656 (2014) doi:10.1007/s00464-013-3224-9

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Keywords

  • Construct validity
  • da Vinci
  • Inanimate exercises
  • Robotic surgery
  • Training