Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 947–953

On the road to single-site laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: lessons learned from 60 cases

  • Cherry E. Koh
  • David J. Martin
  • David J. Cavallucci
  • Guillermo Becerril-Martinez
  • Craig J. Taylor
Technique

DOI: 10.1007/s00464-010-1259-8

Cite this article as:
Koh, C.E., Martin, D.J., Cavallucci, D.J. et al. Surg Endosc (2011) 25: 947. doi:10.1007/s00464-010-1259-8

Abstract

Background

Single-site laparoscopic surgery is a promising emerging technique with potential to decrease postoperative pain, reduce port-site complications, and improve cosmetic results. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LapGB) is a procedure that lends itself well to single-site laparoscopic surgery because the surgery is confined to a single region of the body, the need for a larger incision for port implantation and the fact that bariartric patients are more likely to be body image conscious. The procedure is, however, technically challenging and potentially more time consuming and hazardous. To simplify learning, a hybrid technique that used multiple conventional trocars and laparoscopic equipment through a single periumbilical incision while retaining the use of the Nathanson retractor via a separate epigastric incision was developed. The authors’ experience and results with this technique are described.

Methods

This retrospective review describes the prospectively collected data for the first 60 consecutive cases completed using the minimally invasive technique described.

Results

The 60 cases in this study comprised 12 men and 48 women with an average age of 39 years (range 20–59 years). Their average body mass index (BMI) was 39.1 kg/m2 (range 32–52 kg/m2). Four patients (6.7%) needed an additional port either for hemostasis or for access difficulties. Concomitant hiatal hernia repair was performed for 13 patients. Five patients (8.3%) had superficial wound infection requiring oral antibiotic therapy and dressings. No other complications were observed. Overall, the average operating time was 55 min (range 30–160 min). For both surgeons, the learning curve was six cases, with a significant difference in the operating times between the first six cases and the remaining cases (p < 0.0001, Mann–Whitney U test).

Conclusions

The authors’ early experience with the minimally invasive LapGB technique shows that it is feasible and safe. It can be used either as a bridging technique to single-site LapGB or on its own as a minimally invasive technique.

Keywords

Adjustable gastric band Bariatric surgery Minimally invasive surgery Single-incision laparoscopic surgery Single-site laparoscopic surgery 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cherry E. Koh
    • 1
    • 2
  • David J. Martin
    • 2
    • 3
  • David J. Cavallucci
    • 2
  • Guillermo Becerril-Martinez
    • 2
  • Craig J. Taylor
    • 2
  1. 1.SOuRCe (Surgical Outcomes Research Centre)Royal Prince Alfred HospitalSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryConcord Repatriation and General HospitalConcordAustralia
  3. 3.StrathfieldAustralia

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