Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 23, Issue 8, pp 1845–1848 | Cite as

Radiation exposure during laparoscopic cholecystectomy with routine intraoperative cholangiography

  • A. Karthikesalingam
  • Sheraz R. Markar
  • Ruwan Weerakkody
  • Stewart R. Walsh
  • Nicholas Carroll
  • Raaj K. Praseedom
Article

Abstract

Background

For many years, intraoperative cholangiography during cholecystectomy to aid definition of the biliary anatomy and to detect choledocholithiasis has been advocated. Although radiation exposure in fluoroscopic procedures is a concern, few available data exist regarding the radiation exposure incurred during intraoperative cholangiography. This study aimed to determine the average radiation exposure sustained during this procedure.

Methods

Radiation dose data were recorded between 5 September 2007 and 21 July 2008 for 108 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy with intraoperative cholangiography. Dose area product values were used to calculate the entrance skin dose, an indicator of potential skin damage, and the effective dose, an indicator of long-term cancer risk, for each patient.

Results

The median age of the 108 patients (67% females) included in the data analysis was 51 years (range, 17–87 years). The mean entrance skin dose during intraoperative cholangiography was 0.0069 ± 0.0066 Gy, and the mean effective dose was 0.18 ± 0.17 mSv. No results exceeded the threshold of 2 Gy for skin damage, and the lifetime risk for the development of new cancer due to intraoperative cholangiography was less than 0.001%.

Conclusion

Radiation doses administered during intraoperative cholangiography are safe and do not represent a contraindication to this procedure.

Keywords

Radiation dosage Radiation injuries Cholangiography Laparoscopic cholecystectomy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Karthikesalingam
    • 1
  • Sheraz R. Markar
    • 1
  • Ruwan Weerakkody
    • 1
  • Stewart R. Walsh
    • 1
  • Nicholas Carroll
    • 2
  • Raaj K. Praseedom
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Addenbrooke’s HospitalCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation TrustCambridgeUK
  2. 2.Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke’s HospitalCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation TrustCambridgeUK

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