Thoracoscopic robot-assisted bronchoplasty

  • N. Ishikawa
  • Y. S. Sun
  • L. W. Nifong
  • W. R. ChitwoodJr.
  • M. Oda
  • Y. Ohta
  • G. Watanabe
Letter to the editor

Abstract

Background

In robotic surgery, the ideal position of the system, as well as the optimal working angles and the proper positioning of the thoraco ports position is very important. No robot-assisted bronchoplasty has been reported. Our study describes use of the da VinciTM surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Inc.) for robotic sleeve upper lobectomy in a human fresh cadaver.

Methods

A male cadaver was placed in the left lateral decubitus position. After thoracoscopic upper lobectomy was performed through the working port and the two ports, the robotic system was then set up behind the cadaver. The working port allowed introduction of the optical scope and the robotic surgical arms were inserted into the thoraco ports. The right bronchus was dissected and wedge was cut out with the robotic scissors. After standard lymph node dissection, end-to-end bronchial anastomosis was performed with robotic instruments. Once the anastomosis was complete, air leakage was checked with saline solution placed in the pleural cavity.

Results

Thoracoscopic robot-assisted bronchoplasty was performed successfully.

Conclusions

In evaluating various positions of the system we demonstrated that our technique is sufficient approaches to robotic bronchoplasty. This procedure offers specific advantages over conventional bronchoplasty with accuracy and safety.

Keywords

da Vinci Robotic-bronchoplasty Thoracoscopic surgery 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Ishikawa
    • 1
  • Y. S. Sun
    • 1
  • L. W. Nifong
    • 1
  • W. R. ChitwoodJr.
    • 1
  • M. Oda
    • 2
  • Y. Ohta
    • 2
  • G. Watanabe
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Robotics and Minimally for Invasive SurgeryBrody School of Medicine at East Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of General and Cardiothoracic SurgeryKanazawa University School of MedicineKanazawaJapan

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