Is laparoscopic colorectal surgery less invasive than classical open surgery? Quantitation of physical activity using an accelerometer to assess postoperative convalescence

  • Y. Inoue
  • T. Kimura
  • H. Noro
  • M. Yoshikawa
  • M. Nomura
  • T. Yumiba
  • E. Taniguchi
  • S. Ohashi
  • S. Souda
  • H. Matsuda
Original article

Abstract

Background: With the technical advances of recent years, the number of operative manipulations in the abdominal cavity by laparoscopic surgery is now considered to be the same as that using classical open surgery. The question has been raised whether laparoscopic colorectal surgery with lymphadenectomy improves the recovery compared to open surgery. Methods: We compared patients’ physical activity for 7 days postoperatively as measured with an accelerometer between laparoscopic-assisted colorectal resection (LAC, n = 32) and classical open colorectal surgery (OC, n = 30). Results: Physical activity expressed as cumulative acceleration was significantly higher in the LAC than in the OC group on each postoperative day. The recovery time, defined as the day on which the cumulative acceleration recovered to 90% of the preoperative level, was significantly shorter (p < 0.05) in the LAC (3.4 ± 1.2 days) than in the OC group (6.8 ± 1.7 days). Conclusion: Our results showed that the duration of convalescence with LAC was significantly shorter than that with the OC procedure. Laparoscopic colorectal surgery appears to allow an earlier recovery after the operation than the classical open procedure, and it is less invasive as assessed by convalescence.

Keywords

Accelerometer Physical activity Laparoscopic colorectal surgery Postoperative recovery 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Fukuda, H, Takahashi, M, Miki, K, Haratani, T, Kurabayashi, L, Hisanaga, N, Arito, H, Takahashi, H, Egoshi, M, Sakurai, M 1999Shift work-related problems in 16-h night shift nurses (1): development of an automated data processing system for questionnaires, heart rate, physical activity and posture.Industrial Health37219227PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Inoue, Y, Kimura, T, Fujita, S, Noro, H, Taniguchi, E, Yumiba, T, Nishida, T, Itoh, T, Ohashi, S, Matsuda, H 2001A new parameter for the evaluation of laparoscopic surgery: quantitating physical activity as the degree of convalescence using an accelerometer.Jpn J Gastroenterol Surg34381386Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Iwaoka, H, Yokoyama, T, Masayasu, S, Fuchi, T, Nakayama, T, Tanaka, H 1998Characteristics of energy metabolism in males with mental retardation.N Nutr Sci Vitaminol44151164Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Nomura, A, Kakinoki, S, Takechi, S, Shimono, H, Tomoita, K, Sakurai, M, Kitabatake, A 1996Physical activity affects ambulatory blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive elderly people.Cardiol Elderly4101104Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pfeifer, J, Wexner, SD, Reissman, P, Bernstein, M, Nogueras, JJ, Singh, S, Weiss, E 1995Laparoscopic vs open colon surgery. Cost and outcome.Surg Endosc9132211326PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Phillips, EH, Franklin, M, Carroll, BJ, Falla, MJ, Ramos, R, Rosenthal, DJ 1992Laparoscopic colectomy.Ann Surg216703707PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Schwenk, W, Bohm, B, Muller, JM 1998Postoperative pain and fatigue after laparoscopic or conventional colorectal resections. A prospective randomized trial.Surg Endosc1213111136CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Soper, N, Barteau, JA, Clayman, RV, Ashley, SW, Dunnegan, DL 1992Comparison of early postoperative results for laparoscopic versus standard open cholecystectomy.Surg Gynecol Obstet174114118PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Steele, BG, Holt, L, Belza, B, Ferris, S, Lakshminaryan, S, Buchner, DM 2000Quantitating physical activity in COPD using a triaxial accelerometer.Chest11713591367CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Tsukioka, M, Kamo, C, Kaneko, M, Kobayashi, K, Matsui, T, Shibahara, K, Sugihara, H, Yoneyama, K, Murayama, M 1995The effect of Nipradilol on essential hypertension with cerebrovascular disease assessed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring [in Japanese]Ther Res1611611169Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    van den Berg-Emons, HJ, Bussmann, JB, Balk, AH, Stam, HJ 2000Validity of ambulatory accelerometry to quantify physical activity in heart failure.Scand J Rehab Med32187192Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Westerterp, KR 1999Physical activity assessment with accelerometers.Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord23S45S49CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Inoue
    • 1
  • T. Kimura
    • 2
  • H. Noro
    • 2
  • M. Yoshikawa
    • 2
  • M. Nomura
    • 1
  • T. Yumiba
    • 2
  • E. Taniguchi
    • 3
  • S. Ohashi
    • 3
  • S. Souda
    • 1
  • H. Matsuda
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryNissay Hospital, 6-3-8 Itachibori, Nishi-Ku, Osaka City, Osaka 550-0012Japan
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryOsaka Graduate School of Medicine, OsakaJapan
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryOsaka Central Hospital, OsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations