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Malignant colonic obstruction managed by endoscopic stent decompression followed by laparoscopic resections

  • M. Morino
  • A. Bertello
  • A. Garbarini
  • G. Rozzio
  • A. Repici

Background: Acute left-side colonic obstruction is a surgical emergency whose management is controversial. Recently metallic expandable stents have been used to relieve obstruction either to palliate the condition or to prepare for an elective surgical resection. Methods: We propose a new minimally invasive therapeutic strategy for the management of malignant colonic obstructions: emergency endoscopic stenting followed by elective laparoscopic one-stage resection. The first four cases are presented. Results: The stents were positioned successfully in all cases, and all the patients had an immediate restoration of bowel functions. After a period that varied from 4 to 5 days, they underwent a one-stage laparoscopic resection and were discharged 5 to 7 days after the operation. There were no postoperative complications. Conclusions: Malignant colonic obstruction can be managed by a sequential minimally invasive endolaparoscopic approach with an excellent postoperative outcome, good patient comfort, and a short hospital stay without the need for diverting stomas. A study involving a larger number of patients is needed to determine whether this approach is superior to traditional open surgery in terms of morbidity, mortality, quality of life, and recurrences.

Keywords

Postoperative Outcome Short Hospital Stay Bowel Function Laparoscopic Resection Patient Comfort 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Morino
    • 1
  • A. Bertello
    • 1
  • A. Garbarini
    • 1
  • G. Rozzio
    • 1
  • A. Repici
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Chirurgia Generale IIa, University of Turin, C.so A.M. Dogliotti n° 14, 10126 Turin, ItalyIT
  2. 2.Department of Gastroenterology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, ItalyIT

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