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Dysphagia

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 115–121 | Cite as

The SWAL-QOL Outcomes Tool for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Adults: I. Conceptual Foundation and Item Development

  • Colleen A.  McHorney
  • D. Earl  Bricker
  • Amy E.  Kramer
  • John C.  Rosenbek
  • JoAnne  Robbins
  • Kimberly A.  Chignell
  • Jeri A.  Logemann
  • Colleen  Clarke
Article

Abstract

In the past two decades, noteworthy advances have been made in measuring the physiologic outcomes of dysphagia, including measurement of duration of structure and bolus movements, stasis, and penetration–aspiration. However, there is a paucity of data on health outcomes from the patients' perspective, such as quality of life and patient satisfaction. A patient-based, dysphagia-specific outcomes tool is needed to enhance information on treatment variations and treatment effectiveness. We present the conceptual foundation and item generation process for the SWAL-QOL, a quality of life and quality of care outcomes tool under development for dysphagia researchers and clinicians.

Key words: Health outcomes — Quality of life — Patient satisfaction — Quality of care — Outcomes measurement — Deglutition — Deglutition disorders. 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colleen A.  McHorney
    • 1
  • D. Earl  Bricker
    • 2
  • Amy E.  Kramer
    • 3
  • John C.  Rosenbek
    • 4
  • JoAnne  Robbins
    • 4
  • Kimberly A.  Chignell
    • 4
  • Jeri A.  Logemann
    • 5
  • Colleen  Clarke
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for Health Services Research and Management, University of Kentucky Medical Center, and the HSR&D Program at the Lexington VA Medical Centers, Lexington, Kentucky, USAUS
  2. 2.College of Professional Studies, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USAUS
  3. 3.Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USAUS
  4. 4.William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin, USAUS
  5. 5.Departments of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Otolaryngology and Neurology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USAUS

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