Oecologia

, Volume 178, Issue 1, pp 115–128

Individual variation in anthropogenic resource use in an urban carnivore

  • Seth D. Newsome
  • Heidi M. Garbe
  • Evan C. Wilson
  • Stanley D. Gehrt
Special Topic: Individual-level niche specialization

Abstract

With increasing urbanization, some animals are adapting to human-dominated systems, offering unique opportunities to study individual adaptation to novel environments. One hypothesis for why some wildlife succeed in urban areas is that they are subsidized with anthropogenic food. Here, we combine individual-level movement patterns with diet composition based on stable isotope analysis to assess the degree to which a rapidly growing population of coyotes (Canis latrans) in Chicago consumes anthropogenic resources. We used telemetry to classify coyotes into three groups based on social class and home range composition: (1) residents with home ranges in urban nature preserves; (2) residents with home ranges that had a high proportion of urban land; and (3) transients that had relatively large home ranges and variable use of urban land. We found that natural and anthropogenic resources in this system can be reliably partitioned with carbon isotopes. Mixing models revealed that resident coyotes associated with most urban nature preserves consumed trace to minimal amounts of anthropogenic resources, while coyotes that live in the urban matrix consume moderate (30–50 %) to high (>50 %) proportions of anthropogenic resources. Lastly, we found evidence of prey switching between natural and anthropogenic resources and a high degree of inter-individual variation in diet among coyotes. In contrast to the expectation that urban adaptation may dampen ecological variation, our results suggest individuality in movement and diet exemplifies the successful establishment of coyotes in urban Chicago. Our study also suggests that direct anthropogenic food subsidization is not a prerequisite for successful adaptation to urban environments.

Keywords

Urban ecology Anthropogenic subsidies Coyotes Stable isotopes 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seth D. Newsome
    • 1
  • Heidi M. Garbe
    • 2
  • Evan C. Wilson
    • 3
  • Stanley D. Gehrt
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  2. 2.Max McGraw Wildlife FoundationDundeeUSA
  3. 3.School of Environment and Natural ResourcesThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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