Oecologia

, Volume 157, Issue 1, pp 117–129

Tracing carbon flow in an arctic marine food web using fatty acid-stable isotope analysis

  • S. M. Budge
  • M. J. Wooller
  • A. M. Springer
  • S. J. Iverson
  • C. P. McRoy
  • G. J. Divoky
Ecosystem Ecology - Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00442-008-1053-7

Cite this article as:
Budge, S.M., Wooller, M.J., Springer, A.M. et al. Oecologia (2008) 157: 117. doi:10.1007/s00442-008-1053-7
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Abstract

Global warming and the loss of sea ice threaten to alter patterns of productivity in arctic marine ecosystems because of a likely decline in primary productivity by sea ice algae. Estimates of the contribution of ice algae to total primary production range widely, from just 3 to >50%, and the importance of ice algae to higher trophic levels remains unknown. To help answer this question, we investigated a novel approach to food web studies by combining the two established methods of stable isotope analysis and fatty acid (FA) analysis—we determined the C isotopic composition of individual diatom FA and traced these biomarkers in consumers. Samples were collected near Barrow, Alaska and included ice algae, pelagic phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, seabirds, pinnipeds and cetaceans. Ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton had distinctive overall FA signatures and clear differences in δ13C for two specific diatom FA biomarkers: 16:4n-1 (−24.0 ± 2.4 and −30.7 ± 0.8‰, respectively) and 20:5n-3 (−18.3 ± 2.0 and −26.9 ± 0.7‰, respectively). Nearly all δ13C values of these two FA in consumers fell between the two stable isotopic end members. A mass balance equation indicated that FA material derived from ice algae, compared to pelagic diatoms, averaged 71% (44–107%) in consumers based on δ13C values of 16:4n-1, but only 24% (0–61%) based on 20:5n-3. Our estimates derived from 16:4n-1, which is produced only by diatoms, probably best represented the contribution of ice algae relative to pelagic diatoms. However, many types of algae produce 20:5n-3, so the lower value derived from it likely represented a more realistic estimate of the proportion of ice algae material relative to all other types of phytoplankton. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential value of compound-specific isotope analysis of marine lipids to trace C flow through marine food webs and provide a foundation for future work.

Keywords

Pelagic phytoplankton Diatoms Trophic linkages Compound specific Lipid 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Budge
    • 1
  • M. J. Wooller
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. M. Springer
    • 3
  • S. J. Iverson
    • 4
  • C. P. McRoy
    • 3
  • G. J. Divoky
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Process Engineering and Applied ScienceDalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada
  2. 2.Alaska Stable Isotope Facility, Water and Environmental Research CenterUniversity of Alaska FairbanksFairbanksUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Marine Science, School of Fisheries and Ocean SciencesUniversity of Alaska FairbanksFairbanksUSA
  4. 4.Department of BiologyDalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada
  5. 5.Institute of Arctic BiologyUniversity of Alaska FairbanksFairbanksUSA

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