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Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 375, Issue 1, pp 193–199 | Cite as

Prolactin system in the hippocampus

  • José CarreteroEmail author
  • Virginia Sánchez-Robledo
  • Marta Carretero-Hernández
  • Leonardo Catalano-Iniesta
  • María José García-Barrado
  • María Carmen Iglesias-Osma
  • Enrique J. Blanco
Review
  • 275 Downloads

Abstract

Among the more than 300 biological actions described for prolactin, its role in the neurogenic capacity of the hippocampus, which increases synaptogenesis and neuronal plasticity, consolidates memory and acts as a neuronal protector against excitotoxicity—effects mediated through its receptors are more recently known. The detection of prolactin in the hippocampus and its receptors, specifically in the Ammon’s horn and dentate gyrus, opened up a new field of study on the possible neuroprotective effect of hormones in a structure involved in learning and memory, as well as in emotional and behavioral processes. It is currently known, although controversial, that prolactin may be related to sex and age and that the hormone could be synthesized in the hippocampus itself. However, the regulatory mechanisms of changes in prolactin or in its hippocampal receptors still remain unknown. This review introduces the reader to general aspects concerning prolactin and its receptors and to what is currently known about the role prolactin plays in the brain and, in particular, in the hippocampus.

Keywords

Prolactin Hippocampus Prolactin receptor Neuroprotection Learning and memory 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • José Carretero
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Virginia Sánchez-Robledo
    • 3
    • 4
  • Marta Carretero-Hernández
    • 1
  • Leonardo Catalano-Iniesta
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • María José García-Barrado
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • María Carmen Iglesias-Osma
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Enrique J. Blanco
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Human Anatomy and Histology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of SalamancaSalamancaSpain
  2. 2.Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Institute of Neurosciences of Castilla y León (INCyL)University of SalamancaSalamancaSpain
  3. 3.Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology and Obesity, Institute for Biomedical Research of Salamanca (IBSAL)University of SalamancaSalamancaSpain
  4. 4.Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of SalamancaSalamancaSpain

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