Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 366, Issue 3, pp 617–621 | Cite as

Altered tooth morphogenesis after silencing the planar cell polarity core component, Vangl2

  • Zhaoming Wu
  • Don Jeevanie Epasinghe
  • Jinquan He
  • Liwen Li
  • David W. Green
  • Min-Jung Lee
  • Han-Sung Jung
Regular Article

Abstract

Vangl2, one of the core components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, has an important role in the regulation of morphogenesis in several tissues. Although the expression of Vangl2 has been detected in the developing tooth, its role in tooth morphogenesis is not known. In this study, we show that Vangl2 is expressed in the inner dental epithelium (IDE) and in the secondary enamel knots (SEKs) of bell stage tooth germs. Inhibition of Vangl2 expression by siRNA treatment in in vitro-cultured tooth germs resulted in retarded tooth germ growth with deregulated cell proliferation and apoptosis. After kidney transplantation of Vangl2 siRNA-treated tooth germs, teeth were observed to be small and malformed. We also show that Vangl2 is required to maintain the proper pattern of cell alignment in SEKs, which maybe important for the function of SEKs as signaling centers. These results suggest that Vangl2 plays an important role in the morphogenesis of teeth.

Keywords

Planar cell polarity Vangl2 Enamel knot Morphogenesis Tooth 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhaoming Wu
    • 1
  • Don Jeevanie Epasinghe
    • 1
  • Jinquan He
    • 2
  • Liwen Li
    • 3
  • David W. Green
    • 1
  • Min-Jung Lee
    • 3
  • Han-Sung Jung
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Applied Oral Sciences, Faculty of DentistryThe University of Hong KongHong KongPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of StomatologyGuangzhou Medical CollegeGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of Oral Biology, Oral Science Research Center, BK21 PLUS ProjectYonsei University College of DentistrySeoulKorea

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