Human Genetics

, Volume 103, Issue 3, pp 280–285 | Cite as

Variant in sulfonylurea receptor-1 gene is associated with high insulin concentrations in non-diabetic Mexican Americans: SUR-1 gene variant and hyperinsulinemia

  • Denise L. Goksel
  • Kathryn Fischbach
  • Ravindranath Duggirala
  • Braxton D. Mitchell
  • Lydia Aguilar-Bryan
  • John Blangero
  • M. P. Stern
  • Peter O’Connell
Rapid communication

Abstract

The high-affinity sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1) gene regulates insulin secretion and may play a role in type 2 diabetes. A silent variant in exon 31 of SUR1 (AGG→AGA) was detected by single-strand conformational polymorphism and genotypes were determined for 396 Mexican American subjects (289 non-diabetic). The normal and mutant alleles were designated G and A, respectively. Among non-diabetics, those with the AA genotype had higher fasting insulin values than those with the AG and GG genotypes (113.4 pmol/l for AA vs 82.8 pmol/l for AG/GG, P=0.043). Similar results were observed for 2-h insulin (849.6 pmοl/l for AA vs 498.6 pmol/l for AG/GG, P=0.0003) and for the proinsulin to specific insulin ratio (0.068 for AA vs 0.056 for AG/GG, P=0.030). Specific insulin levels also differed significantly across the three genotypic classes (P=0.021). No differences in fasting glucose, body mass index, or waist circumference according to genotype were noted. Two-hour glucose was modestly higher in individuals with the AA genotype. Since we have previously reported linkage between SUR1 and hyperglycemia, the present association between a SUR1 variant and hyperinsulinemia in normal individuals from a high diabetes risk ethnic group raises the possibility of primary insulin hypersecretion as an antecedent of type 2 diabetes in at least some individuals from this population.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise L. Goksel
    • 1
  • Kathryn Fischbach
    • 1
  • Ravindranath Duggirala
    • 3
  • Braxton D. Mitchell
    • 4
  • Lydia Aguilar-Bryan
    • 5
  • John Blangero
    • 4
  • M. P. Stern
    • 3
  • Peter O’Connell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USAUS
  2. 2.Institute of Biological Anthropology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKGB
  3. 3.Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78284, USA e-mail: stern@uthscsa.edu, Tel.: +1 210 567 4737, Fax: +1 210 567 6955US
  4. 4.Department of Genetics, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, Texas, USAUS
  5. 5.Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USAUS

Personalised recommendations