Advertisement

Human Genetics

, Volume 102, Issue 2, pp 221–223 | Cite as

Localisation of receptor interacting protein140 (RIP140) within 100kb of D21S13 on 21q11, a gene-poor region of the human genome

  • Nicholas Katsanis
  • Jane H. Ives
  • Jeurgen Groet
  • Dean Nizetic
  • E. M. C. Fisher
Original investigation

Abstract

Human chromosome21 is the smallest and one of the most intensively studied autosomes. The generation of high quality genetic and physical maps for the long arm has enabled the research community to accelerate gene discovery and the identification of disease loci on the chromosome. However, the emerging pattern from large-scale transcriptional mapping from many groups suggests that the majority of the 600–1000genes predicted to reside on the chromosome are clustered in two distinct regions of the long arm, on distal 21q22.1 and 21q22.3. Here, we report the mapping of the gene for receptor interacting protein140 (RIP140) on 21q11 by means of YACs, PACs and hybrid cell lines. We have placed RIP140 within 100kb of D21S13, in a region of the chromosome where only one other gene has been described to date. The association of the RIP140 protein with the superfamily of nuclear receptors may be of significance in studies of trisomy21 (Down syndrome) and Alzheimers disease, since a modifier locus has been speculated to reside on 21q11.

Keywords

Human Genome Research Community Down Syndrome Nuclear Receptor Human Chromosome21 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas Katsanis
    • 1
  • Jane H. Ives
    • 2
  • Jeurgen Groet
    • 2
  • Dean Nizetic
    • 2
  • E. M. C. Fisher
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurogenetics Unit, Imperial College of Medicine at St. Mary’s, Norfolk Place, London W21PG, UK Tel.: +44-171-594-3758; Fax: +44-171-706-7094NF
  2. 2.Centre for Applied Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, University of London, 29/39 Brunswick Square, London WC1N1AX, UKGB

Personalised recommendations