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Human Genetics

, Volume 108, Issue 1, pp 59–65 | Cite as

AFLP fingerprinting of the human genome

  • Michal Prochazka
  • Ken Walder
  • James Xia
Original Investigation

Abstract.

Elucidation of the genetic basis of complex traits and diseases in humans includes the use of genome-wide association studies that depend on the analysis of a large number of diallelic markers. We describe the application of the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique as an efficient approach for rapidly identifying and scoring multiple variants in the human genome. Using a commercially available kit, we found that AFLP yields reproducible DNA fingerprints consisting of 42–132 fragments, 8% of which show variability between individuals. These variant markers appear to be from different chromosomes, and the majority of them is diallelic. Based on the information obtained in this study, it is possible to approximate the minimum number of selective AFLP primer combinations needed to approach a desired coverage density of all chromosomes. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the general applicability of AFLP in humans and providing a constructive guide for the design of genomic studies in Homo sapiens with this robust methodology.

Keywords

Human Genome Amplify Fragment Length Polymorphism Prime Combination Complex Trait Genomic Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michal Prochazka
    • 1
  • Ken Walder
    • 1
  • James Xia
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Diabetes and Nutrition Section, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 4212 N. 16th Street, Rm. 5–44, Phoenix, AZ 85016, USA

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