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Human Genetics

, Volume 132, Issue 12, pp 1427–1431 | Cite as

No evidence of interaction between known lipid-associated genetic variants and smoking in the multi-ethnic PAGE population

  • Logan Dumitrescu
  • Cara L. Carty
  • Nora Franceschini
  • Lucia A. Hindorff
  • Shelley A. Cole
  • Petra Bůžková
  • Fredrick R. Schumacher
  • Charles B. Eaton
  • Robert J. Goodloe
  • David J. Duggan
  • Jeff Haessler
  • Barbara Cochran
  • Brian E. Henderson
  • Iona Cheng
  • Karen C. Johnson
  • Chris S. Carlson
  • Shelly-Anne Love
  • Kristin Brown-Gentry
  • Alejandro Q. Nato
  • Miguel Quibrera
  • Ralph V. Shohet
  • José Luis Ambite
  • Lynne R. Wilkens
  • Loïc Le Marchand
  • Christopher A. Haiman
  • Steven Buyske
  • Charles Kooperberg
  • Kari E. North
  • Myriam Fornage
  • Dana C. Crawford
Short Report

Abstract

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many variants that influence high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and/or triglycerides. However, environmental modifiers, such as smoking, of these known genotype–phenotype associations are just recently emerging in the literature. We have tested for interactions between smoking and 49 GWAS-identified variants in over 41,000 racially/ethnically diverse samples with lipid levels from the Population Architecture Using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study. Despite their biological plausibility, we were unable to detect significant SNP × smoking interactions.

Keywords

Cotinine Serum Cotinine Lipid Trait Serum Cotinine Level Smoking Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The Population Architecture Using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) program is funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), supported by U01HG004803 (CALiCo), U01HG004798 (EAGLE), U01HG004802 (MEC), U01HG004790 (WHI), and U01HG004801 (Coordinating Center), and their respective NHGRI ARRA supplements. The contents of this paper are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. The complete list of PAGE members can be found at http://www.pagestudy.org. The “Epidemiologic Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE)” is funded through the NHGRI PAGE program (U01HG004798 and its NHGRI ARRA supplement). Genotyping services for select NHANES III SNPs presented here were also provided by the Johns Hopkins University under federal contract number (N01-HV-48195) from NHLBI. The study participants were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), and these studies are supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Multiethnic Cohort study (MEC) characterization of epidemiological architecture is funded through the NHGRI PAGE program (U01HG004802 and its NHGRI ARRA supplement). The MEC study is funded through the National Cancer Institute (R37CA54281, R01 CA63, P01CA33619, U01CA136792, and U01CA98758). Funding support for the “Epidemiology of putative genetic variants: The Women’s Health Initiative” study is provided through the NHGRI PAGE program (U01HG004790 and its NHGRI ARRA supplement). The WHI program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; NIH; and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through contracts N01WH22110, 24152, 32100-2, 32105-6, 32108-9, 32111-13, 32115, 32118-32119, 32122, 42107-26, 42129-32, and 44221. The authors thank the WHI investigators and staff for their dedication, and the study participants for making the program possible. A full listing of WHI investigators can be found at: http://www.whiscience.org/publications/WHI_investigators_shortlist.pdf. Funding support for the Genetic Epidemiology of Causal Variants Across the Life Course (CALiCo) program was provided through the NHGRI PAGE program (U01HG004803 and its NHGRI ARRA supplement). The following studies contributed to this manuscript and are funded by the following agencies: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study is carried out as a collaborative study supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts: HHSN268201100005C, HHSN268201100006C, HHSN268201100007C, HHSN268201100008C, HHSN268201100009C, HHSN268201100010C, HHSN268201100011C, and HHSN268201100012C. The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study is supported by the following National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute contracts: N01-HC-95095; N01-HC-48047; N01-HC-48048; N01-HC-48049; N01-HC-48050; N01-HC-45134; N01-HC-05187; and N01-HC-45205. The Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) is supported by contracts HHSN268201200036C, N01-HC-85239, N01-HC-85079 through N01-HC-85086, N01-HC-35129, N01 HC-15103, N01 HC-55222, N01-HC-75150, N01-HC-45133, and grant HL080295 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), with additional contribution from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Additional support was provided through AG-023629, AG-15928, AG-20098, and AG-027058 from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). The Strong Heart Study (SHS) is supported by NHLBI grants U01 HL65520, U01 HL41642, U01 HL41652, U01 HL41654, and U01 HL65521. The opinions expressed in this paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Indian Health Service. Assistance with phenotype harmonization, SNP selection and annotation, data cleaning, data management, integration and dissemination, and general study coordination were provided by the PAGE Coordinating Center (U01HG004801 and its NHGRI ARRA supplement). The National Institutes of Mental Health also contributes to the support for the Coordinating Center. The PAGE consortium thanks the staff and participants of all PAGE studies for their important contributions.

Supplementary material

439_2013_1375_MOESM1_ESM.docx (29 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 29 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Logan Dumitrescu
    • 1
  • Cara L. Carty
    • 2
  • Nora Franceschini
    • 3
  • Lucia A. Hindorff
    • 4
  • Shelley A. Cole
    • 5
  • Petra Bůžková
    • 6
  • Fredrick R. Schumacher
    • 7
  • Charles B. Eaton
    • 8
  • Robert J. Goodloe
    • 1
  • David J. Duggan
    • 9
  • Jeff Haessler
    • 2
  • Barbara Cochran
    • 10
  • Brian E. Henderson
    • 7
  • Iona Cheng
    • 11
  • Karen C. Johnson
    • 12
  • Chris S. Carlson
    • 2
  • Shelly-Anne Love
    • 3
  • Kristin Brown-Gentry
    • 1
  • Alejandro Q. Nato
    • 13
  • Miguel Quibrera
    • 14
  • Ralph V. Shohet
    • 15
  • José Luis Ambite
    • 16
  • Lynne R. Wilkens
    • 11
  • Loïc Le Marchand
    • 11
  • Christopher A. Haiman
    • 7
  • Steven Buyske
    • 13
    • 17
  • Charles Kooperberg
    • 2
  • Kari E. North
    • 3
    • 18
  • Myriam Fornage
    • 19
    • 20
  • Dana C. Crawford
    • 1
    • 21
  1. 1.Center for Human Genetics ResearchVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Public Health SciencesFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Office of Population GenomicsNational Human Genome Research InstituteBethesdaUSA
  5. 5.Department of GeneticsTexas Biomedical Research InstituteSan AntonioUSA
  6. 6.Department of BiostatisticsUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  7. 7.Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  8. 8.Department of Family MedicineWarren Alpert Medical School Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  9. 9.Translational Genomic Science InstitutePhoenixUSA
  10. 10.Baylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  11. 11.Cancer Research CenterUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA
  12. 12.Department of Preventive MedicineUniversity of Tennessee Health Science CenterMemphisUSA
  13. 13.Department of GeneticsRutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA
  14. 14.Gillings School of Public HealthUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  15. 15.John A. Burns School of MedicineUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA
  16. 16.Information Sciences InstituteUniversity of Southern CaliforniaMarina del ReyUSA
  17. 17.Department of StatisticsRutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA
  18. 18.Carolina Center for Genome SciencesUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  19. 19.Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, School of Public HealthUniversity of Texas Health Sciences Center at HoustonHoustonUSA
  20. 20.Institute of Molecular MedicineUniversity of Texas Health Sciences Center at HoustonHoustonUSA
  21. 21.Department of Molecular Physiology and BiophysicsVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

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